Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters Cinema Design Concessions in older theaters
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Concessions in older theaters

Concessions in older theaters 29 Jan 2008 11:23 #29520

  • Cinemateer
  • Cinemateer's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 300
  • Karma: 0
I've noticed recently that some older theaters (pre-60's) were constructed with the concessions area just inside the front doors at a 90 degree angle to the entrance. When there is a line at the concession stand, the patrons who enter would run into those in the concessions line and would have to go around them to either get into the auditorium or get in line at the concessions.

Having a line of people in front of the entrance doesn't seem like the best way to lay out the lobby. Does anyone know what the reason behind this design was?
"In a place like this, the magic is all around you. The trick is to see it." -Martin Landau
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Concessions in older theaters 29 Jan 2008 15:18 #29521

  • slapintheface
  • slapintheface's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 2458
  • Thank you received: 22
  • Karma: -64
The focus back then was not on candy...imagine......Just putting on the best show they could.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Concessions in older theaters 29 Jan 2008 21:49 #29522

  • revrobor
  • revrobor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1136
  • Thank you received: 23
  • Karma: -7
Most theatres built that way had both the concession stand and box office in one unit, usually to minimumize staff.

Bob Allen
The Old Showman
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Concessions in older theaters 30 Jan 2008 13:46 #29523

  • rodeojack
  • rodeojack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1255
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: 2
Seems to me that candy, or the quality of the show wasn't necessarily as important as putting as many seats into the available square footage as possible.

I once had an indoor that was set up like this. The "snack bar" was wedged in under the stairs to the booth and restrooms. There was room for 2 people, a very small popcorn machine, candy rack and Coke dispenser. One line went across the front and had a tendency to block the two entrances to the auditorium. The "foyer" was an 8-foot hallway between the main doors and the back of the auditorium.

Times have sure changed!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re:Concessions in older theaters 22 Oct 2008 12:15 #30156

  • dnedrow
  • dnedrow's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 72
  • Karma: 1
As a late addendum to this, keep in mind that many theaters built in the early 20th century didn't include concession stands at all. The theatre owner generally provided a "concession" to a third party vendor to sell outside the theatre and divide the proceeds with the owner. As concession stands became more common -- and far more important to the bottom line -- old theaters often had stands retro-fitted into existing lobbies. In most cases, the stand would be against a side wall, since the front and back of the lobby would normally be doors.

A vintage theatre I'm working to re-open actually had a separate concession with a candy shop in an adjoining storefront. It was run by two sisters who sold candy, popcorn, comics, etc. I believe that arrangement lasted all the way until the beginning of the 60s.

-David
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re:Concessions in older theaters 23 Oct 2008 09:38 #30171

  • rodeojack
  • rodeojack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1255
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: 2
dnedrow wrote:
A vintage theatre I'm working to re-open actually had a separate concession with a candy shop in an adjoining storefront. It was run by two sisters who sold candy, popcorn, comics, etc. I believe that arrangement lasted all the way until the beginning of the 60s.

-David

Good observation.

One of the original downtown theatres here (now a church) had a concession stand in an adjoining storefront. Originally, it had no opening to the lobby.

I guess the "no outside food" policy wouldn't have applied back then! :silly:
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.149 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction