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TOPIC: Seating

Seating 28 Nov 2005 18:12 #28973

  • thite
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Hi everyone, just a quick question.

Im just trying to find out what the approximate number of seats for a theatre. Maybe just a general idea of seat count from small to large, an approximate average, and seats per row. I know I could get over to a local theatre to find this out, but im currently awaiting surgery for two tendons in my knee, so not as mobile right now..

Thank you
Travis
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Re: Seating 29 Nov 2005 09:38 #28974

  • Mudbrother
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I know that many chains will not give you an exact count for security reasons. We don't have that policy, so I'll tell you ours. We're a single screen historic downtown theatre. We seat 477. I would count that on the large side of house size, but hopefully others will weigh in.

Rance
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Re: Seating 29 Nov 2005 11:57 #28975

  • John Pytlak
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Seats can range from a few dozen for a small "screening room" type theatre, to thousands. The Kodak "Theater on the Ridge" in Rochester has about 2000 seats for a 25 x 60 foot screen -- used for employee "family movie" screenings and events such as the annual stockholders meeting.

Standard SMPTE 196M suggests the optimum viewing area for a screening room is between 2 and 4 times the image height from the screen. For 35mm film, some seats may be as close as 1 image height, to as far as 5 or 6 image heights from the screen.

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
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Re: Seating 01 Dec 2005 15:26 #28976

  • SamCat
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I would start and look at how wide and long you can make the cinema or cinemas and the catchment area and how many people you think you would be able to obtain.
Once you have the widths and lengths and they are rectangular in length with the width not as wide as the length as what John explained above then you could start researching the building regulations in your area. The rows between seats are normally about 1150mm spacings where we live but some cinemas are going 1250mm and having up to 20-40 seats per row with a 1200mm isle on each wall of the auditorium.
I guess it would also depend on the seat widths as well. In the cinema that I work for we use to use 50cm seat widths but we have had to go to 55cm widths because the competition went to 55cm. I now think the competition is now at seats 60cm wide but you would have to check with your seating manufacturers. Just about all the cinemas these days are trying not to have the isle in the centre anymore but to have a few seats and then the isle to the end of the wall. The average in the country where we are is about 200 seats, one of our cinema dimensions of 193 seats are 13.6 metres wide,18.6 metres long, 2 isles of 1050, 11 rows, of which two rows are before the crossover at the front, the first row 4.4 metres from the screen, 16 seats per row made up of 2 seats from entrance, then first isle, then 10 seats, then second isle and then 4 seats. You could probably juggle these dimensions around a little by your seat widths and row widths.
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