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TOPIC: Scone lighting

Scone lighting 06 Oct 2003 04:22 #28414

  • garymey
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Anybody have some old light scones that would fit into a deco theater. Don't have to be too fancy.

I may go with some very nice looking sconces from IKEA. We have one in a hall and it looks great. I know these aren't made for the long hours of use we'll give them but at under $20 each.....any concerns?
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Re: Scone lighting 06 Oct 2003 08:01 #28415

  • jimor
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The Theatre Historical Soc. often learns of fixtures for sale, and you can phone them, or simply place an ad in their Newsletter. See the link by that name on their sidebar: www.HistoricTheatres.org

In regard to getting any fixtures, remember that quality is best in the long run. As you surmise, not every fixture is built for the use that you will put it to, so look for a fixture with porcelain sockets, or at least an open top fixture that allows for lots of air movement and easy relamping. Many art deco designs would fit this description. If you will be using compact fluorescents exclusively in the fixtures, be sure that the intended lamp will fit the available space without touching anything but the socket, and that there is enough room for it inside the fixture (many fixtures were designed for a specific type of incandescent bulb -- usually the 'A' type -- and compact fluorescents are often too big.) Don't take a salesman's assurance; insist on taking a fixture in hand and putting in your intended bulb to make sure it fits. Porcelain sockets are most needed for higher wattage incandescent bulbs, but they are better quality and would be nice for fluorescents as well, as regards longevity. Also consider multi-circuit fixtures if your locality requires automatic emergency lighting, as many municipalities do. These might be incandescent sockets even of plastic, since they won't normally be in use, and will operate on low voltage battery supply, which most compact fluorescents won't. This would eliminate having to use those ugly flood-light battery units sold everywhere, if you are in a position to run low voltage wiring from a central battery/control in a back area, where the battery would be a lot more accessable!

I probably don't have to mention this, but you want your fixtures out of the easy reach of tall fellows who are on the basket ball team, and might think it 'cool' to reach up and take a bulb or even a part out of a fixture. Moral: all fixtures should be accessable only by ladder, else must be closed fixtures not too easy to open. You would be surprised at how inventive vandals can be! For the same reason, the fixture should accept some heavy wall bolts (yes, more than one) to anchor them securely, lest you find that the 'patrons' consider them neat souvenirs. Of course, if you really like the design, you will want to keep at least one extra fixture in storage, if not more, for the inevitable breakage from relamping or whatever that will take place over the years. Best Wishes, Jim (member [url=http://www.HistoricTheatres.org)]www.HistoricTheatres.org)[/url]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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Re: Scone lighting 06 Oct 2003 16:20 #28416

  • BurneyFalls
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Isn't there a problem using fluorescents for wall sconces if they are on a dimmer? I am going back to wall sconces when I put in new wall drapes later this year. I intend to have them dim halfway during trailers and off during the feature.
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Re: Scone lighting 07 Oct 2003 01:23 #28417

  • garymey
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Yes. You beat me to saying that about flourescents and dimmers. They are working on a bulb that will dim but don't know how reliable it is yet.

Thanks for al the other info.
Great.
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Re: Scone lighting 07 Oct 2003 09:34 #28418

  • John Pytlak
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There are dimmers that are specifically designed to work with fluorescent lamps, but even they sometimes flicker as the light level is reduced. Do NOT use a SCR dimmer intended only for incandescent lamps.

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
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Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
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Re: Scone lighting 07 Oct 2003 09:49 #28419

  • jimor
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Yes, SOME fluorescents can be dimmed using special dimmers specifically designed for the type of fluorescent you will be using. The problem with dimming COMPACT fluorescents is that they have an electronic package (which fails to create the start current under the reduced voltage of a dimmer) rather than the standard ferromagnetic ballest, but even such iron ballests require specially designed dimmers. So, no, you can't just use any dimmer at the store for your fluorescents. It requires MATCHING dimmers fo the type of fluorescent you are using.

Fluorescents do provide much greater economy of power usage (and less heating of the auditorium) even if the initial per-lamp cost is higher. Still, if you like the look of dimming fixtures which brighten during intermissions, you can achieve the same effect by using DUAL CIRCUIT fixtures. You have the dim circuit 'on' during projection using lower wattage lamps, and then you turn 'on' the higher wattage lamps in addition during non-projection times. This arrangement does not require dimmers, yet achieves almost the same effect; having the lower wattage lamps on during projection will diminish any 'light shock' that might be sensed by patrons when the intermission lights turn 'on'. You would use the cuing provisions of your automated projector to trigger the appropriate logic circuits and their relays to turn the lights 'on' and 'off' as needed.
With this arrangement, it is easier to install a "panic" switch in an out-of-reach place near the entrance door that can be used to immediately turn on the house lights to full brilliance if a panic should arise. This is not required under all codes, but should be! There are many tragic accounts of people being trampled during a panic when there was no one in the projection booth watching the screen/auditorium to note a panic and turn 'on' the lights. Such switches usually activated the relay for the main house lights by bypassing the stage/projection controls to directly energize the relays. These relays were often of low voltage types set up so that if there were a general power failure, the battery supply would automatically activate the relays and put current to the lights while automatically disconnecting the mains power to them; something to consider if you are planning a cinema.

The use of a seperate circuit for during-projection times also allows you to consider a tinted light that would be less annoying and would complement your decor colors. Amber, rose? These were commnon choices during the movie palace days and they did set the standard for showmanship. A fixture with such lamps behind suitable colored glass or plastic would eliminate the hassle of getting or finding colored lamps. Dimming is a nice touch, but it does add to costs, whereas dual circuits usually only mean slightly more expensive fixtures and another wire in the conduit. If your locality requires a seperate EMERGENCY lights circuit, you can get TRIPLE CIRCUIT fixtures with provision such a low voltage circuit also, in addition to the main and dim circuits. Some cinemas use their seperate CLEANING lights as the emergency circuit, but you would have to check if that is permissable in your area.
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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Re: Scone lighting 15 Oct 2003 20:51 #28420

All lighting in a theatre should be on a variable dimmer to prevent "eye shock" from a rapid change in light level
To date there are dimmable compact flourescents but No automated dimmer will work with them
The only dimmers are still rotar styled dimmers that automation will not talk to nor the firealarm bump to full easily

Also a discharge lamps of this style have a colder solour rendition index and really have no place in any theatre audtitorium
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