Banner
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: seating questions

seating questions 20 Apr 2003 19:26 #28269

  • crshedd
  • crshedd's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 43
  • Karma: 0
does a 20" seat include the armrests? does a row of 12 seats translate into 20'? is 40" from the back of one row to the back of the next row sound too generous or not enough?

thanx.

'hey! there's no party here!'
jeff spicoli
fast times at ridgemont high
'hey! there's no party here!'
jeff spicoli
fast times at ridgemont high
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 21 Apr 2003 07:16 #28270

  • mesbursmith
  • mesbursmith's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 136
  • Karma: 0
Dear crshedd

Seat widths are measured from centreline of armrest to centreline of armrest. When you calculate the length of a given number of seats, you must add the width of one extra armreset (usually 4 inches) so 12 seats @ 20" each comes to 20'-4". If seats are against a wall, we always allow an additional 6" clearance against the wall.

mesbursmith
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 22 Apr 2003 14:10 #28271

  • Large
  • Large's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1074
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
20" is too damn narrow! We just installed 22" and 23". If I could I would have installed all 24".

40" is good. Make sure they build you two practice rows before you commit.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 22 Apr 2003 14:26 #28272

  • mesbursmith
  • mesbursmith's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 136
  • Karma: 0
Large

I agree that 20" is too narrow. But that wasn't the question. We average 21" in most theatres. Regardless of the seat width, make sure you add the extra 4" for the extra armrest. As far as row spacing goes, on conventional sloped floors, 40" is adequate by today's standards, but for stadiums, I wouldn't go less than 44".

mesbursmith
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 28 Apr 2003 10:20 #28273

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Today's audiences have gotten used to "super-sized" meals, so theatres should "super-size" seats to fit the new body shape. ;-)

A few extra inches of legroom goes a long way to increase comfort too.

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 585-477-5325 Cell: 585-781-4036 Fax: 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 04 Jun 2003 08:06 #28274

  • jimor
  • jimor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 395
  • Karma: 0
As always, check your local codes perhaps with a lawyer or engineer speacializing in that area. Many larger municipalities have codes specifying exactly the MINIMUM widths of seats, aisles, distances, etc. Many smaller areas merely say that they enforce the latest National Fire Protection Assn. code as their local code. The NFPA has a web site and Bulletins available on their standards.

I agree, bigger seats are much better since Americans are, indeed, bigger, and we have come to expect more comfortable seating. Sad to say, these days with such dismal fare on the screens, the patrons are all the more aware of their surroundings, and many of them come with friends and family to really make a 'party' in the seats where they expect enough room to turn around, drink holders for the jug-like super cups, and cushions that never let them feel a hard surface. Like motels, cinemas have become 'entertainment centers,' for better or worse, and a modern exhibitor has to acceed to the expectations of today's patrons, unless he plans to enforce an austere house for cinephiles only. I rarely go to cinemas anymore just because they have become 'party rooms' for absolutely thoughtless patrons. Yes, management could throw the miscreants out, but there are rarely ushers any more, and many of today's patrons could intimidate any usher. After all, true ushers don't hire on to be 'bouncers.' It's becoming a sad state of affairs.

And some cinemas are trying to lure the crowds by putting in sofas and love seats, whereupon the parents bring along their toddlers at all hours who totter about in the darkness with parents calling out to them, and the kids running about giggling. I had one toddle over to me during the movie, giggle cutely but loudly, and then dump his/her soda on my shoe while laughing loudly and running away. The parents just looked on beaming at their "precious" and made no effort to apologize or corrall the youngster. I mentioned it to the ticket taker who didn't know where the owner/manager was (and couldn't care less) and neither did anyone else; all were quite unconcerned! It seems the motto these days is: "Ya buys ya ticket, ya takes ya chances." Still want to run a cinema?

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited June 04, 2003).]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: seating questions 05 Jun 2003 14:44 #28275

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5011
  • Thank you received: 40
  • Karma: 15
I don't know where the preceding poster goes to the movies but it's not at my theatres.

Michael Hurley
Impresario
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.183 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction