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TOPIC: COncession Stand Design

COncession Stand Design 15 Aug 2005 02:43 #26880

  • SamCat
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Does any body have a whiz banger design or pictures for a concession stand that will take in big $$$$.?
Where is the best place to put the popcorn and the postmix, water fridge, self service area, lollies etc.
Also what factors can a cinema operator do to improve the $$$ per head spent?
What are peoples experiences with bars and cafes in the auditorium and foyer?
With VIP seating in the foyer is it profitable? Do you improve much $$$ per head?
Is it better to go for a large range or a smaller range displayed more often?
Is it better to have a candy bar and ticket box merged or ticket box and candy bar seperate?
What has been peoples experience improving $$$ per head between Coke and Pepsi?
Is there a ratio how many cash registers to have for how many people you expect through the door?
Is there a ratio how many people buy from the candy bar through the door?
Anyway these are some questions it would be great to get some feedback and comments and comparisons on.
Talk Soon

Sam

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Re: COncession Stand Design 15 Aug 2005 09:55 #26881

  • jimor
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This is said to be a really GREAT concession stand design, but it is in the COLOSSUS-18 in Canada and is for Big Bucks only, as is obvious from the picture. I'm not sure that you will be able to get the starship Enterprise to land in your cinema, but Best Wishes. Click on: http://www.cinematour.com/tour.php?db=ca&id=1355
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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Re: COncession Stand Design 14 Oct 2005 12:07 #26882

In my experience, every theatre I've been too has the popper(s) against the back wall, and fountains with a one till on each side of it.

Also, in high school we were taught about the affect of colour on the body, and red increases hunger, alertness and excitement.
Since 1987
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Re: COncession Stand Design 15 Oct 2005 17:25 #26883

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Andrew is right about the color Red being advantageous to concession areas, but don't overdo it, especially if the auditoriums are also in a red hue. Overall design quality is more important than a single color, and having a table/chairs area is vital to those stands serving more than popcorn and a drink. Keeping the cash terminals along the back wall is not a good idea since it requires the attendant to turn his/her back to the patrons --who may be reaching over the counter to filch anything within reach, so that is why many cinemas employ cash drawers under the counter in front, sometimes securely kept locked by mens of a foot pad behind the counter that electrically unlocks the drawer ONLY when the vendette's foot is on the mat, in case she should turn her back for something. High volume locations will also want a cash bag shute through the floor into a secured room below, so that ony a limited amount of cash is kept behind the counter, which limits losses during hold-ups, as well as employee theft. The same shute might accept different color bags from the box office for the same reasons. Your computerized cash terminal can be programmed to flash a light when there is enough to warrant a 'depost' down the chute.

Also, a properly designed front counter is of a water-proof surface canted slightly toward the customer's side to a gutter rim hidden in the front lip of the counter to catch any spills by draining them away to a downspout through and under the counter to a slop sink or bucket there. Customers resent soda splashing down the counter tops onto their clothes!

Outdoor grade carpeting should be used since it will not rot due to spilled food and it will be less a slip-and-fall hazard than a hard, wet surface, and it is cheap and easy to replace when the time comes. Some types are available as 2-foot-square tiles that are easily replaced, but these can be problematic if there is not enough time to let their mastic (glue) set properly. A curled edge on a carpet tile can be much more a threat than a spill, so you would have to keep an eye on them with replacements readily at hand along with the proper mastic.

A brightly lit SAFETY-glass display space inside the counter is a good idea, but it must be kept clean. A hot foods area should be next to the seating area, and not the auditorium doors or the games area, if any. You want to isolate food service as much as possible to limit spills that add to your 'sticky floor index.' A janitor's closet should abut the lobby and allow for quick removal and use of vacuums, mops, and the like, and should NOT be placed in the men's room, since janitors are often women nowadays. Drinking fountains should be provided lest you look like a piker by refusing free water to your patrons, who will get quite dry during winter heating. No, not all patrons will buy sodas or bottled water if they are thirsty, and will resolve not to come to your place again if they must even BUY a drink of water. It is just like having 'pay toilets'; they don't increase profits and just dim the public's perception of your place, but do keep the drinking fountains OUT of the public traffic ways, perhaps by completely recessing them in a niche or alcove that could be backed with patterened glass blocks which are backed with neon or fluorescents so that one is not sticking his head into a dark recess where someone may have left something nasty in the drinking fountain where there is little light to see it before one bends his head down! A pedestal drinking fountain in a well lighted semicircular niche is elegant and not too costly. Don't worry about such a lighted niche detracting from your concessions; if people want to eat, they will assuredly find your food!

If you have a grill or other flame-heated devices, be sure a plastic pipe comes in from outdoors to supply combusion air for the flames, else you will have poor flames and air infiltration from elsewhere, which defeates air conditioning and heating. Avoid glass walls unless someone else will always be there to pay your heat and air. If an exhaust hood is required, you will also need an expensive heated make-up air intake, so be aware of that in your plans.
Keep lavatories near the concession areas, but design the doorways to them so as to not expose the interiors to any passerby who may get more of an eyeful through a quickly opened door than they were counting on, and for those who DO count on it, you will want to discourage such who might linger in your lobby. Lobby seating is required, but NOT in view of open lavatory doors! Put sanitary drains (small sewers) in both the lobby and lavatories; overflows and kicked buckets of water are bound to happen someday, and it is good to have somewhere to let the water drain to while your people are scurring for mops and pails, if they even notice a spill.

Keep the area bright; about 100 foot-candles in general, equivalent to a living room, but not a doctor's office. Trying to save too much money on general lighting can be a lesser savings if people can't make each other out from a distance or clearly see the food they are eating; you don't want a cave-like look, since much greater savings on electricity costs can be made elsewhere. Try to avoid having the auditorium doors open directly upon the eating/concession or lavatory areas, since these are areas of noise that won't help the people watching the show.

A glassed-in area containing plants replaced seasonally and lit by hidden fluorescents will add a nice focal point to the lobby, and a large fish tank in such place will work well too, provided that no patrons can touch the things inside the glass hexagon or circle. You might be able to persuade a local garden society or fish club to maintain such a spot, in exchange for free advertising on a descreet sign inside the enclosure. Such will add life to otherwise static, and overly commercial lobbies found in almost every cinema. This will help especially if you have a cafe area, but then you should plan for such a focal point by providing it with a hidden slop sink having water and sewer connections. Movie posters in cases on the walls are de rigeur, but don't forget the ceiling as a good space to decorate and help lend ambiance to your place that the chain mall down the road doesn't have. Don't use automatic senting machines since if you serve food, the odors will sometimes clash. Having some patrons vomit due to such clashes will not add to your atmosphere.

Don't worry about providing a coats check room; people today don't trust them and will often wear their coats throught a movie if you keep the temps set at around 65 degrees, which saves you a lot on heating bills, but won't freeze them out. Also, don't believe that you have no legal responsibilty for lost (stolen) items in an "At-Your-Own-Risk" check room; the signs which say such at restaurants and the like are bogus: you ARE responsible for the patron's belongings under what is called a bailment law. Their lawyer will know about this regardless of what any sign you might have will claim.

Require your lobby staff to wear SOMETHING to show that they are on your staff so that the appropriate gender can stroll through the rest rooms on a schedule so that they do not become 'no-man's-lands' and open to any pervert who will watch to see if they are ever patrolled (and, no, you cannot put security cameras in there without going afoul of the law!) Name tags with your theatre logo are good, but you ALSO need something easily seen from a distance, such as a fabric military cap sold at a local PX. These look rather professonal and of serious intent, without demanding that anyone wear a full uniform, which you usually cannot legally insist on these days if the employees object and turn you in to the EEOC office.

Give all new employees a "smile lesson" to show them HOW to smile to patrons to show pleasantness and greetings. We live in a surly day and age where school kids are anything but smiling little angels, so do plan on giving them a short course in customer satisfacton. Don't expect them to know how to smile (considered a sign of weakness by many youths) or how to count change if they will be handling money; schools don't teach such things any more, so it is up to you to train, discipline and manage your staff, and to have an ADULT on duty visible to the patrons to whom they can complain with some assurance of rectification of the complaint. Your office with a glass window onto the lobby may be just the thing. Being in a remote office and having the high school kids supervise the high school kids is the same as asking the mouse to guard the cheese! The goal is to create a memorable experience for the patrons --even if the movie is junk, as they often are. At least then they are not as likely to blame your cinema for the quality of the movie --provided the projection was adequate, and there weren't so many ads and previews that they forgot why they came. And if the movie is rotten, they can at least feel they have not wasted their time if the lobby is warm and inviting where they can sit down and eat something to 'sooth the savage beast.' (though if it is TOO warm and inviting and free to the street, it may attract too many 'beasts' and be an invitation to become a difficult-to-control playground!) Seems like there is always a trade-off!



[This message has been edited by jimor (edited October 15, 2005).]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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