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TOPIC: The Art of Popcorn

The Art of Popcorn 06 Apr 2004 08:24 #26554

  • Mudbrother
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Hi all,

I thought I would solicit opinions on making the best corn. And I'm not talking about the debate on coconut oil vs others. (Is there even a debate here anymore?
) I'm more interested in any tricks or tips you may know for getting the very best pop.

For example, I know popcorn has an ideal moisture content (about 13% isn't it?) What is the best method of storage to make sure that it retains that level of moisture without losing or gaining any? Which popcorn brand do you folks use? Any brands produce less husk in the finished corn? Any ideas for lessening the number of husks or old maids?

I'd love to hear some thoughts, especially from you guys that have been in the business quite awhile.

Rance
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 06 Apr 2004 12:53 #26555

  • outaframe
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OK, the straight "poop" on popcorn IS that despite all the hoopla and advertizing claims for "gourmet", "high volume", "optimized", etc. it's pretty much all the same, as long as you're comparing the same type of raw corn... Large kernel yellow is the best choice all around: it gives the maximum volume per pop, and is the least fragile (tendancy to break up) after it's popped... IF your popper has an adjustable thermostat, the best popping temp is a bit cooler than where it starts to scorch, and that will also be the spot which produces the fewest "old maids", because you can leave it "on heat" the longest, which will pop those last few remaining kernels... The moisture content is pretty much out of your hands, what you get is what it was when bagged... If you buy it in 50# bags with the vinyl inner liner, it will "keep" for months, as long as you roll the bag down and clamp it shut after it's opened... I try to estimate how much corn I'll need every day, and fill the bin accordingly... The heat from the pan warmer will dry the corn some, if it's left in there for several days, needlessly... I have used generic and name brands interchangably, depending on current market costs, shipping, etc., and as long as it's not dried out, it all pops about the same... Jolly Time claims to sort out the "culls" and it DOES seem to have the most uniform sized kernels... Avoid any corn which has not been "processed" because those funny black things you'll find in it are rat doo-doo!... Other than this, I have never found a magic formula to produce the best results... It's all pretty good!...
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 06 Apr 2004 13:49 #26556

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Outtaframe,

Thanks for the advice. Any ideas on how to best figure the temperature without burning any corn? I just have our thermostat set to Cretor's recommended (425 F) I think, or somewhere around there.

I've been storing kernels in a large rubbermaid container. Maybe this wouldn't be the best, as it may allow it to dry out too much. Maybe keeping it in the bag would be better. (Or inside the bag in the container..)

Thanks again,
Rance
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 06 Apr 2004 22:54 #26557

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HELLO RANCE <> If any of the above was useful to you, you're more than welcome... As to setting your thermostat, they're not really that accurate: just keep advancing it 'til it starts to scorch, then back it down a tad, and call it good enough... Your Rubbermaid container should be fine IF it has a snap-on lid... My old Manley has a huge bin which is fine when you're busy, but leaving it in there for several days (especially with the heater pan, just above it "on," which it nearly always is) seems to dry the unpopped corn a bit... The plastic lined shipping bags DO work fine, as long as you keep 'em rolled down & closed, so whichever is easiest in your situation is the way to go... Happy Popping!...
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 07 Apr 2004 14:36 #26558

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We use Vogel popcorn. Sysco tried to drop Vogel and substitute their house brand but we could taste the difference and we got them to switch back.

We just bought a new Cretors Diplomat. Cretors used to set their kettles at 500 degrees and that was good for Coconut Oil which doesn't scorch. But now that many theatres us Canola or blends and they scorch. So Cretors sets their kettles lower. We had to adjust our kettle thermostat a little optimise our popping for us. I don't know the temperature but the corn is very good now.
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 09 Apr 2004 09:56 #26559

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Thanks for the advice. I will try raising the thermostat for our Cretors popper. It may help things a bit.

Rance
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 09 Apr 2004 16:54 #26560

500 Degrees is fairhenheit, right? What would that be in Celsius?

Thanks

"Would you like fries with that?"
Since 1987
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Re: The Art of Popcorn 10 Apr 2004 05:07 #26561

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"500 degrees is Fahrenheit... What would that be in Celsius?"

C = F-32 X 5/9... 500-32 X 5/9 is 260 degrees C...
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