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TOPIC: Concession Statistics

Concession Statistics 13 Jul 2002 13:35 #26252

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Here I am going to post some of our concession statistics for our 5-screen Art House.

Candy = 4.48% of our total sales
Popcorn = 46.07% of our total sales
Soda = 24.56% of our total sales
Specialty Drinks = 15.19% of our total sales
Cookies = 2.53% of out total sales
Ice Cream = 3.71% of our total sales
Bagle Dog = 2.45% of our total Sales

So as you can see, Drinks are 39.75% of our Total Sales. But Popcorn and Soda are 70.63% of our Total Sales. The things we have added to the menue because we are an Art House have only added 23.88% to our total sales. As you can see, candy doesn't count for much. Also the profit margins aren't that great for candy.
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Re: Concession Statistics 13 Jul 2002 13:40 #26253

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Candy Breakdown

Specialty Chocolate bar $3.25 = 2.01% of the catagory.
Goobers = 1.20%
Raisinettes = 8.03%
Hot Tamales = 7.23%
Jr. Mints = 26.10%
Milk Duds = 16.87%
Red Vines = 6.83
Dots = 10.04%
Sweet Tarts = 4.02%
M&M = 14.86%
Whoppers = 2.81%
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Re: Concession Statistics 13 Jul 2002 13:48 #26254

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Popcorn

Small Popcorn $3.50 = 45.90% of the catagory
Medium Popcorn $4.00 = 29.16%
Large Popcorn $4.50 = 19.82%
Junior Combo $3.50 = 5.12%

Popcorn Costs
(Includes corn, butter, bag, salt and oil)

Large = $0.43
Medium = $0.32
Small = $0.22
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Re: Concession Statistics 13 Jul 2002 13:57 #26255

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Drinks:

Soda:

Small (22oz) Soda $2.75 = 40.73% of the catagory
Medium (32oz) Soda $3.25 = 36.22%
Large (44oz) Soda $3.75 = 23.06%

Soda Costs to come later.
See below.

Specialty Drinks:

Large (24oz) Lemonade $4.00 = 13.69% of the catagory
Small (16oz) Lemonade $3.25 = 21.15%
Bottled Drinks $2.75 = 5.75%
Bottled Water $1.75 = 39.81%
Coffee $1.50 = 14.93%
Lattte/Mocha/Cappucino $3.00 = 4.54%
Espresso $2.00 = 0.16%

Lemonade Costs:

We source lemons in two places. Sysco has ugly old lemons with a few moldy ones thrown in for fun at $26 per 40# case. Costco has beautiful Sunkist lemons at $40 per 40# case.

So our lemonade costs per glass are:

Small $0.40-$0.50
Large $0.60-$0.80

Either way, we make money.


[This message has been edited by Large (edited July 13, 2002).]
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Re: Concession Statistics 13 Jul 2002 21:49 #26256

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As promised, Soda costs:

I have used the cup, lid and syrup prices to reach these costs. I have omitted the CO2 and ice costs which I am sure amount to less than $.02 per serving. There is also labor to consider but that just makes my brain hurt.

Small (22oz) Cup Cost $0.05, Lid Cost $0.04, Syrup costs $0.09, Total Cost $0.18, Price Sold $2.75, Profit $2.57.

Medium (32oz) Cup Cost $0.10, Lid Cost $0.06, Syrup costs $0.12, Total Cost $0.28, Price Sold $3.25, Profit $2.97.

Large (44oz) Cup Cost $0.16, Lid Cost $0.08, Syrup costs $0.17, Total Cost $0.41, Price Sold $3.75, Profit $3.34.

Assumptions:

We have determined that if you fill the cup half full of ice, the ice will occupy 1/4 of the volume. So soda will occupy 3/4 the available volume.

22 oz cup contains 16 oz of soda
32 oz cup contains 24 oz of soda
44 oz cup contains 32 oz of soda

5 gallons of syrup makes 30 gallons of soda. The mix is 5 to 1. So 30 gallons of soda = 7680 oz. We pay $39.85 for a 5 gallon box of soda.
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Re: Concession Statistics 14 Jul 2002 13:22 #26257

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Popcorn Breakdown:

These are the results of our tests to determine yeald and product costs for popcorn.

Assumptions:

With corn the ounce measure is a matter of volume not wieght.

Cost of a 12.5 pound bag of raw corn is $3.96, there are 200 oz of corn and the cost per oz is $0.02.

Cost salt is $0.63 per box, there are 26 oz, so cost per ounce is $0.02.

Cost of a 50 pound can of Canola Oil is $50.30, there are 800 oz, cost per ox is $0.06.

Cost of Butter is $42.43 per gallon, there are 160 oz in a gallon, cost per oz is $0.27.

One Batch is 700 popped oz of corn, cost per batch is $1.12, cost per oz is $0.0016.

Popcorn Sizes:

Large (170 oz), Cost of bag is $0.16, Cost of product is $0.27, Total cost $0.43, sell for $4.50.

Medium (130 oz), Cost of bag is $0.11, Cost of product is $0.21, Total cost $0.32, sell for $4.00.

Small (85 oz), Cost of bag is $0.08, Cost of product is $0.14, Total cost $0.22, sell for $3.50.

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Re: Concession Statistics 14 Jul 2002 14:05 #26258

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Large, This is great stuff. Even as an owner I've never taken the time to do these breakdowns. Thanks for letting us copy your homework!
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Re: Concession Statistics 14 Jul 2002 19:12 #26259

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As my father just pointed out: The previous examples are just my raw material costs and don't reflect the cost of being in business. Each and every soda and popcorn sold has a portion of the following attached to it. Working up numbers for these categories would be a masturbatory exercise and would be theoretical at best.

Costs to consider:

<B>Rent
Utilities
Trash Hauling
Insurance
Staff Costs
Management Salaries
Cleaning supplies
Theatre Cleaners
Water
Sewer
Sales Tax
Marketing expenses
Phone
Delivery Charges</B>

That Coke is getting mighty expensive!
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Re: Concession Statistics 23 Jul 2002 17:10 #26260

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Thank you for this extrordinary work.

As your father said.. the difference in accounting terms are "cost of goods sold" and "overhead". the first item would be gross income/ sales(minus)cost of good sold (minus)overhead= profit.

I have a partner in another business who always refers to our gross as "We MADE 23,000.00." And I after 13 years still say. "No Bill, we GROSSED 23,000.00 and net profit was 4200.00." Gross is not net unless you're in the fishing supply biz.

Michael Hurley
Impresario
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Re: Concession Statistics 24 Jul 2002 11:41 #26261

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Running concession is like having a restaurant that you have to pay for 24/7 but your only open for 20 minutes twice a day!
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Re: Concession Statistics 24 Jul 2002 23:15 #26262

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Once upon a time, over a hundred years ago, the motion picture camera and projector were invented. It took almost 10 years before the idea of charging the public to watch short films had caught on to the point that places of business called nickelodeons became common place.

About the same time the practice of creating motion pictures with a plot or storyline also came into being. The first film exchange had opened in 1903, but the proliferation of film houses didn't spread nationwide through virtually every town and village until 1908. It became a practice from almost the very beginning to sell peanuts or candy bars to the audience between shows for extra income. Usually a huckster from outside was allowed to come in with the agreement to share the profits with the theatre owner. As the film industry came into its own and larger more ornate and much more comfortable theatres were built in the late teens and early twenties the practice of selling concessions was frowned upon and disappeared from almost all theatres.

Throughout the haydays of hollywood and the movie palace era of the twenties theatres relied upon ticket sales as their only source of income. It wasn't until the depression that exhibitors started looking for additional avenues of income that concessions again reared their ugly head. Small town and late run houses would stoop to selling these items, but deluxe theatres still refused to do so. By the forties even the deluxers couldn't justify not taking advantage of the income from concession sales and began installing refreshment stands within their walls.

Naturally the film studios felt that they deserved a share of this income, for if it wasn't for their product the theatres wouldn't have any one to sell to. Since the exhibitors would never agree to give distribution a share of their concession gross they devised a way to get some of it anyway. They simply increased the film rental. In 1940 it was the norm not to pay more then 35% for a first run film. Many films were sold at a flat rate. That disappeared in the first runs very quickly and by 1970 had virtually disappeared from subrun as well.

So today when we pay up to 70% for firstrun film rent we are indeed giving a share of our concession gross to the studios.

Now you may ask, why have I brought this up in a thread about the cost breakdown of concession items. Good question. It was the comment about the other costs that need to be figured in to the cost of refreshments... things like utilities, rent, insurance etc. There are many ways to do accounting (just look at the front page news recently), but I was taught by the oldtime showman, those that were around back in the days of no concession stands, that all costs for running the theatre get charged against film grosses. In other words the theatre should stand on it's own as though there were still no refreshment sales. The concession income (after deducting cost of goods) is extra and is our true profit. In reality we know that very few theatres would break even if it were not for concessions. In most cases theatres show a loss at the box office when all overhead costs are charged against ticket sales. It takes a portion of the concession sales to pay off the loss, and what remains is then our profit. When we establish our house overheads for 90/10 deals we include (or should) all expenses except the actual cost of concession goods and film rental.

It is a shame that we are in an era when we as an industry must not only sell refreshments, but have video games, and screen ads to turn a decent profit.

Being the oldster that I am, I refuse to sell screen ads, film or slides, and will never have video games in my theatre as well. Refreshments are something that the public actually wants, but screen ads most do not care for. And video games would not be of any interest to my patrons, and many have thanked me for not having them as they are afraid that they would encourage teens to hang around the theatre. We are happy that we make money without a teen patronage, and we are a moveover run commercial house, not an art house.

So the point here is not to worry about trying to figure out what percentage of the house expense should be tagged onto the cost of each concession item. Let the film income pay for that and only charge the actual cost of goods against your refreshment items.

[This message has been edited by RoxyVaudeville (edited July 25, 2002).]
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Re: Concession Statistics 01 Nov 2002 11:33 #26263

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Bump
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Re: Concession Statistics 13 Apr 2003 12:11 #26264

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Bump
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Re: Concession Statistics 15 May 2003 18:46 #26265

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Excellent bit of history! Really makes you realize why concessions are so spendy. They have to be.

Thanks! =)
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