Banner
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Ticket Pricing

Ticket Pricing 01 Jul 2003 22:32 #24036

  • JayAlv
  • JayAlv's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 0
I am in the early stages of a very unique business plan development for a location in NYC. Don't laugh, however, I would like to charge $40 per ticket for admission. Is it possible, to break-out the local market price of admission ($10.00) and bill the other $30 for 2 pre-paid cocktails. (Since, New Yorkers are used to paying $15 for a cocktail.) I would still be paying the studio their 50-60% of the $10.00.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 00:06 #24037

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 889
  • Thank you received: 16
  • Karma: 3
No, it is NOT.

If you read any film contract you will see that it states that the percentage paid for film rent is based on the ticket price to enter the theatre. You can not include in the ticket price other services or concessions or anything and then deduct a portion so as not to pay film rent on that total ticket price. It goes as far as also stating that if you charge extra for a service within the theatre that the cost of that service most be included when calculating the film rental. Example: You have a balcony, and after entering the theatre you charge an extra 50 cents to sit in the balcony. That must be included as part of the admission price. You have an arrangement with a parking garage, but don't want it to look like your patrons pay extra for parking, so you include it in the ticket price. You then must pay film rental on the parking portion as well.

I wouldn't go so far as to say that it can't be negotiated with the distributors, but it won't be easy, because if they give in to you it will set a precedent that they would then have to honor to others.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 06:26 #24038

  • JayAlv
  • JayAlv's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 0
How about an annual membership fee? Would it be possible to charge customers a $1000 annual membership fee? Then charge $10 for ticket admission.

I am trying to make this theatre an upscale, more private event and still be able to show first run films.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 08:09 #24039

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 889
  • Thank you received: 16
  • Karma: 3
What a nightmare that would be as the membership fee would still be required to be broken down for film rental purposes. It's in the contracts. Any such fee still gets charged as part of an admission and get billed for film rentl.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 08:16 #24040

  • JayAlv
  • JayAlv's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 0
Do you have any suggestions on how I can show first run films and keep the cinema exclusive? I am looking to target a clientele that has high 6 figure annual income.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 13:01 #24041

  • Large
  • Large's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1074
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Attending a movie at a movie theatre is a populist activity. By it's very definition attending a movie is an activity where you expose yourself to the public. Being such I don't think that the very rich will pay just to avoid the huddled masses. There are theatres right now that have a couple of auditoriums where the ticket price is higher and for that you get popcorn and soda, a leather chair with elbow room, an un-crowded environment. But what I haven't seen is a wholesale rush to put them in every complex. This tells me that they are only marginally successful. People just will not pay extra for extra services, they want them included.

I know that there are cruises for rich people, golf courses for rich people, country clubs and yacht clubs. But I have a suspicion that if a rich person wants a luxurious movie going experience they will install a kick-ass screening room.

There have been some attempts at an upscale airline and that failed. But people will pay for the strangest things so I can't really tell you if it will work or not. But my gut instinct is that it would fail spectacularly.

Wasn't Radio City Music Hall an upscale movie going experience? The tickets were higher priced and you got the Rockettes.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 16:18 #24042

  • jimor
  • jimor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 395
  • Karma: 0
Aside from the legal problems with both public law (limits who you can exclude in a semi-public venue) and the contract law with the distributors, there is probably no way this will work financially unless you FIRST have a guaranteed, up-front DEPOSIT on hand from MANY 'subscribers.' You would have to show that list to a banker and proof of their deposits to get his attention.

Still, it is a wonderful concept to perhaps be able to return the monied ones to the days of deluxe showmanship and deferential patron care a la the days of the movie palaces. I can see you restoring a fabulous palace (the KINGS in Brooklyn?) with its own walled and patroled parking lot with space for all the limos, the canopied processional way to the entry, guarded by uniformed 'doormen', the glittering lobby where nothing so gauche as a concesion stand exists, but waiters supervised by a concierge take their orders for any menu from any 4-star restaurant in town, as uniformed ushers guide them to their reserved seats, as the million dollar silk drapery slowly ascends as the pipe organ serenades them before the picture shines as the rippling velour parts. Ahh, time travel back to the 'good 'ol days'; we can all dream, can't we?

If you wonder what I am talking about, by all means go to the nearest large library (or at [url=http://www.amazon.com)]www.amazon.com)[/url] and get the landmark book that tells it like it was: THE BEST REMAINING SEATS: The Story of The Golden Age of The Movie Palace" by the late Ben M. Hall (1961), since that is really what you seem to want to recreate. And for only $14 million? A bargain for the richies indeed! If I can be of any help, let me know. We all want to return to the 'PARADISE.' You will make Radio City M.H. look like a circus tent in the 'nabes.'
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 02 Jul 2003 18:53 #24043

  • JayAlv
  • JayAlv's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 0
Jimor - now you are talking. You have the concept.

This is my goal. However, you said only $14 million. Do you think it will be substantially more?

I have a group of investors who love the idea, so money is not an issue.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 03 Jul 2003 13:13 #24044

  • jimor
  • jimor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 395
  • Karma: 0
JayAlv, I am astonished that you found a group of investors who would even consider restoring a movie palace, if that is what you mean. In the first place, it is astoundingly expensive (which is one reason that so few have been actually restored!), and, secondly, most of them have well over a thousand seats, and it is hard to imagine that you would have anywhere near so many subscribers. One can feel a certain majesty in those vast auditoriums, but sometimes the goal is intimacy in the crowd, and that is not too easy in such vastness of empty seats, but this is a matter of taste.

I certainly do not mean to question your statement that "money is not an issue" but I have heard of some well-heeled investors back out of a movie palace deal after getting the bills and finding out the sometimes astronomical costs involved, especially when the city steps in and insists on code updates that may not really be needed, but are found in obsolete building/safety codes. Go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/historicmoviepalaces/ to read about the sad fate of the beautifully restored NEW REGAL (former AVALON) in Chicago and the 18-million dumped into it without a viable business plan. It closed after ten frustrating years last Monday. Another group has been trying to raise money for years to halt the decay and then restore the former UPTOWN there, but with over 4,000 seats the 14-story-high auditorium building is just too daunting for most any investors. Restoration there is estimated at 30 million!

Far be it from me to discourage anyone with unlimited funds and great courage, as well as the taste to pull off such a venue in this day and age! I guess it largely depends upon just how much capital you have and how big and needy a theatre you undertake. If you and your group are serious, contact http://www.ConradSchmitt.com/ for their experience with nearly 100 theatre restorations of different calibers. They and the Theatre Historical Soc. ( www.HistoricTheatres.org ) can relate experiences and direct you to better architects now practicing in this field.

By all means, obtain and read the best advisory in this area: "Movie Palaces: Renaissance and Reuse" by Joe Valerio and Dan Friedman (1982) for many excellent pointers. It is available on inter-library loan or possibly from Mr. Valerio's architectural office in Chicago. You can also read my review of it and try to get copies of it from www.Amazon.com Also, the League of Historic Am. Theatres ( www.LHAT.org ) will have advice for anyone entering the area via membership. If you want an introduction to such palaces and see some restorations and refurbishments, quickly phone the Theatre Historical Soc. to be included in their Conclave starting in Chicago on the 8th through the 14th when they will tour some 20 theatres. It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see history that is fast vanishing, and you will tour the NEW REGAL too. Best Wishes on your venture, Jay!

P.S. If you decide that you want to go on this Conclave tour (which normally includes a banquet, slide show of member's theatres, and luxury bus ride to all locations) you might not be able to get anyone by phone (630-375-0431) or e-mail since they are leaving for the Conclave (convention) hotel, so fly to the hotel (The Palmer House Hilton, 17 East Monroe; 312-726-7500) and find the THSA Registration guys and explain that even if there are no more bus seats, you are willing to follow in a rented car to the outlying locations (such as the NEW REGAL/AVALON). They will still charge you the full registration fee of $375, but that is peanuts to a group like yours. Don't forget to bring your camera and LOTS of film! You will kick yourself later if you don't. I won't be there, unfortunately, but you will meet lots of kindred souls eager to help you learn more, and there are often architects and restorers on the tour, which is guided.

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited July 03, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited July 03, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited July 03, 2003).]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 03 Jul 2003 22:26 #24045

  • JayAlv
  • JayAlv's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 0
Thank you sooo much for your reply. Your remarks are very insightful. However, I am not interested in restoring an existing movie palace. One of the investors owns a building in NYC that we are considering using for this project. The lot is 100x100. It is a very industrial space. I am interviewing architects as we speak.

Do you own a theatre? If not, how are you involved in the industry?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 04 Jul 2003 00:49 #24046

  • Adam Fraser
  • Adam Fraser's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 83
  • Karma: 0
I would Talk to film distributers before you ever talked to any architects. Then you would know at least you had some product to play. I would not think that an industrial place would be the place to make a movie palace, people would want to be in an upscale part of town. Also, assuming the building was an industrial one there would have to be some major renovations to the building so it could even be a theatre i.e. sloped or stadium floor, booth, lobby, proper soundproofing, and the list goes on. I agree with Large, most people that have lots of money and like movies have their own private screening rooms.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Ticket Pricing 07 Jul 2003 12:53 #24047

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Again, the Little Theatre, a five-plex art house, has survived by going non-profit:
http://www.little-theatre.com/jointhelittle.html

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 585-477-5325 Cell: 585-781-4036 Fax: 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.197 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction