Banner
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: Theatre use

Theatre use 04 Jun 2003 18:40 #23967

  • Purple Cow
  • Purple Cow's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
Hi!

How do you, the theatre owner, determine what you will show in your theatre? Are you able to show any independent films you so wish or do the first run distributors pretty much control your screens? Can anyone approach a movie theatre owner and "rent" their screen?
Excuse the ignorance ahead of time but I am new to this...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 05 Jun 2003 12:00 #23968

  • BECKWITH1
  • BECKWITH1's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 769
  • Karma: 0
Yes, we do control what we show on our screens within limits. However, once we agree to a contract with a distributor for a certain film be it first run, subrun, independent or whatever, we must adhere to the terms of the contracts. All first run contracts limit the showing of any other film on that screen. Some owners will still rent some screen time to an outside group depending upon whether they feel that they will get caught and whether it is worth it to them. Showings scheduled before noon may be available. Sometimes the bigger plexes have a screen where the distributor has given permission to mix an older film with something else but there is nothing available they can mix it with. You could rent some of the screen time legitimately in that case but they won't know until Monday that they have a screen available starting Friday. There is no way that you are going to rent screen time at the popular movie going times like 7:00 on Friday or Saturday night unless you are buying the screen for the entire week which is called 4 walling.

Subrun contracts often allow for mixing of film from different distributors on the same screen so you are much more likely to rent screen time from a subrun theater owner. In many cases the subrun owner only has to show his other films once per day in order to meet the contract terms. We have often rented the theater for 4 hours on Sunday afternoon to an outside group (Bollywood is big here). Then shown the other films starting at 4:00 or so.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 05 Jun 2003 16:37 #23969

  • revrobor
  • revrobor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1125
  • Thank you received: 21
  • Karma: -8
It all depends on whether you do your own booking or hire a booker and what arrangement is made with the distributors. It's difficult to go head-to-head with the corporate big boys on first run stuff. So if they are your competition you should try other product or "late run" general product at a reduced price.

Whether they want to admit it or not even the multi-plexes are run by the distributors because they buy into the battle for all the product distributors heavily promote.

Bob Allen
The Old Showman
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 05 Jun 2003 20:16 #23970

  • Purple Cow
  • Purple Cow's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
Just call this Theatre 101...

When you say the contracts limit the showing of any other film on that screen, is that because you have agreed to show it a certain number of times and there are no other show times available for other films? Or do they actually "own" (by contract) your screen for the whole first run?

When you say "other product" what do you mean?

And what is Bollywood?

Thanks for the education. This stuff is fascinating!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 06 Jun 2003 11:05 #23971

  • BECKWITH1
  • BECKWITH1's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 769
  • Karma: 0
Yes, once you have agreed to a first run contract, the distributor does call the shots on that screen. Some contracts specify the number of times you must run their movie but most don't. You cannot show anything else on that screen even if you show the contracted film just once per day without the distributor's permission. Anything else and you run the risk of getting into trouble with that distributor and being banned from getting their product. Sometimes you can get into trouble unintentionally by scheduling shows that work great for you and your local market- i.e. 6:00 and 8:00 on a week night- but the distributor gets bent out of shape by not having a 7:00 show. Once called to the mat you must pull all of your advertising and change your showtimes. It isn't fun but that is the business!

(For those of you in small towns I'll bet that your competitors and the distributors agents don't check your recorded messages and newspaper advertisements very much. But those of us in metropolitan areas get checked up on to make sure that we don't pull any fast ones- mostly it is a case of someone not communicating ALL the contract details).

Bollywood is the colloquial name for the very active Indian film market. Bollywood product is made in India for the Indian market and imported here for showing to the large Indian populations who love their cultural movies. Generally, local cultural organizations rent the film they want to see from a distributor and then rent a theater to show it in.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 06 Jun 2003 13:58 #23972

  • Large
  • Large's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1074
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Actually I think the film contracts state that they own the screen for all of the regularly scheduled show times. Since our regularly scheduled show times are 12:00 Noon to about 10:00 PM we can and have scheduled other films outside of those show times. But we don't do it every day, or then that would be our regularly schedule show times as well.

We run Movies In The Morning for about 6-month per year. We play them around 10:30 AM 4-days per week. We also frequently cancel shows for special performances mostly on Thursdays. The first Thursday of the month we run a film series for the public radio station. The second Thursday of the month we run a Gay Men’s Film Series. In the fall we run the Jewish Film Series. Most distributors don’t mind if you tell them about it and ask permission. We tend to cancel the slowest of our 5-films.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 09 Jun 2003 20:26 #23973

  • BECKWITH1
  • BECKWITH1's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 769
  • Karma: 0
The key words in both scenarios are: ASK PERMISSION.
Large: I am pleasantly surprised that art/independent distributors have been nice about allowing you to cancel their shows to run other films. The big distributors have not been so nice in my experience but then they have bigger egos and more money riding on these films. We did graciously receive permission from Buena Vista to not run Toy Story 2 for the afternoon of my husband's mothers funeral on a major national holiday. But then we weren't running anything else either.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 11 Jun 2003 13:56 #23974

  • Large
  • Large's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1074
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Those special shows are very much like sneak previews in the commercial theatres. Usually it is the same distributor and then they have no problems canceling one show for a preview of another. For the Gay and Jewish film series we just get permission and we always do it on a Thursday, which is a slow night.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 11 Jun 2003 15:06 #23975

  • Purple Cow
  • Purple Cow's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
Have you ever seen a large corporate company (i.e. a Coke, Proctor & Gambel)try to distribute a film? Or would they just hit a road block from the major "regular" distributors? Even if they were just trying to get films run in the 10:00am - 12:00noon time frame?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 16 Jun 2003 10:16 #23976

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
I remember the days of "Modern Talking Picture Service", where theatres could rent free one-reel "short subjects" sponsored by major corporations. Usually well-produced and entertaining documentaries, with a "soft sell" message. Were good "fillers" at the drive-in I worked at.

One even was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject in 1964:
http://home.datacomm.ch/lzehnder/1964.html



John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 585-477-5325 Cell: 585-781-4036 Fax: 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 16 Jun 2003 16:51 #23977

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 889
  • Thank you received: 16
  • Karma: 3
Ah yes... Modern Talking Picture Service. I used there shorts. Many of them were very good. I wish that they were still available... or are they? I still have there catalogs. I wonder if they are still around.
I doubt it.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 16 Jun 2003 22:11 #23978

  • Purple Cow
  • Purple Cow's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
So no corporately distributed main-stream features? Why wouldn't they? Would the traditional distributors block them from getting into the theatres today?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 17 Jun 2003 07:45 #23979

Because it would be like you treading on another crack dealers territory and taking their profit. you don't see the major studios making toilet paper. (but if they thought they could make money they would)

Plus most corporations are spending their cash on advertising and don't wish to venture into the 30 million plus cost of a movie and then have it bomb.

When I was in Houston a major furniture store produced a Chuck Norris movie and it bombed bigtime. "Mattress Mack" said he would never venture into the movie industry again and would just sell furniture. (although he sponsors major sporting events now, He does have a lot of money)

Corporate America will keep doing what they know best and leave the movie making to Hollywood and others.

I don't think its a road block per say but if all of the screens are booked with someone elses product then you have to wait in line.

There was an independant filmmaker who pulled some favors with our booker and got his film booked in two of our theares in Houston. ( it was really bad and subsequently bombed) But that was the only way it got on screen.

The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 17 Jun 2003 08:28 #23980

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Modern Talking Picture Service Inc. will send you a 300 page catalog of videos and software which you can purchase. The first 30 pages lists videos you can send for on loan for FREE. They even pay return postage. They stock mostly titles from industry and foreign embassies with a wide range of topics in almost all subject areas. Write to:


Modern Talking Picture Service (MTPS)
Scheduling Center
5000 Park St. N
St. Petersburg, FL 33709-2254
Tel.: (800) 243-6877
Fax: (813) 546-0681

· specialization: - handles documentary films, videos and newsreels

Here's a link to a history of business films:
http://members.aol.com/dansweb451/busfilm.html


John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 585-477-5325 Cell: 585-781-4036 Fax: 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Theatre use 17 Jun 2003 21:22 #23981

  • garymey
  • garymey's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 46
  • Karma: 0
Modern Talking Pictures was the largest of the sponsored film distributors. As a teen I got films to fill out my film society showings. Some were artistically good but most were competent travelogues or informative long commercials.

When I first got into the biz a local indie distributor handled bookings for Modern in our area. She'c come look at our charts once a month and send in reports to say how many people saw each title in each theater. She did ship the prints but they rarely showed except as a time filler or in case of a print problem. They were good as part of bank/savings and loan matinees.
Screen ads (which I won;t play in my theatre)have been around since the start of movies and in earlier live theater days the curtain often contained many ads for local businesses.

Screen sponsored shorts have also been tried. BREAKING THE HABIT was a superb anti-smoking short by John Korty (AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITTMAN, GO ASK ALICE, ALEX AND THE GYPSY, RIVERRUN,etc) sponsored by the Cancer Society.
Arrow Shirts presented a funny comedy about Tennis (I thinnk it was called TENNIS GAME)and American Express tried a series of shorts in the 80s.

I have been working on a similar concept recently wherein a company is the presenter of shorts that would be married to features.

In a sense big companies do produced and distribute features. Sonby is the most obvious but they are actually thinking about spinning off the entertainment division. AOL doesn't understand entertainment and their taking over Warners has had mixed results.

But big companies have and will continue to invest in films.

Consumer products often sponsor special film series and film festivals.




The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2
Time to create page: 0.228 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction