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TOPIC: Booth Exhaust Machine

Re: Booth Exhaust Machine 10 May 2003 08:17 #21494

Even Ozone free xenon lamps emit some ozone and also the ignitor and spark gap generate some during ignition
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Re: Booth Exhaust Machine 30 May 2003 05:06 #21495

  • Big Guy
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But over at http://www.ozone.ca/index.html they say that

"Ozone generators from Crystal Air and C20 deodorizer are widely used for the easy elimination of pet & skunk odors, smoke, mold, fungus, fire, flood, and almost any odor at work or at home. Crystal Air ozone generators, used properly can also be used to purify the air and recreate the same fresh air that we experience shortly after a thunder storm."

So why vent the ozone from the lamp? <sarcasm being used liberally>
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Re: Booth Exhaust Machine 30 May 2003 15:26 #21496

  • John Pytlak
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Ozone can be nasty stuff if you breathe it:


http://www.ehs.umaryland.edu/OSH/msds/july00.htm
http://www.hankinozone.com/msds.html
http://www.airliquide.com/en/business/products/gases/gasdata/index.asp?GasID=137

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 585-477-5325 Cell: 585-781-4036 Fax: 585-722-7243
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Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
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Re: Booth Exhaust Machine 04 Jun 2003 11:37 #21497

  • jimor
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OZONE: More and more reports are saying that ozone even in small quantities is not good for humans. Yes, it may remove some ordors, but the ozone molecule is still there and detrimental to living tissue, even plants! Ozone is not only produced in the booth, but also in switch rooms for stage lighting in some larger theatres and should be vented to the outdoors, where it will eventually find its way up in the atmosphere. Consumer Reports magazine says that those products sold as air cleaners/negative ion producers produce too much ozone to be good for people, so I would trust them with no axe to grind before I will trust merchants interested in selling the machines, and only in making a profit, and not with my health.

EXHAUST FANS: it is certainly good to well exhaust your booth, for the sake of the machinery, and also for the sake of anyone working there, but we often forget that the air supply must come from somewhere in order to go somewhere! If a fan/blower does not find enough air pressure on its supply side, it will merely spin in space, moving little air out even though the blades are clearly moving. In fact, some blowers will overheat their motors if there is a vacuum-like negative air pressure on their intakes, and this will burn out the motor in time, achieve little air exhaust, and possibly start a fire in the motor if it is slowed or stalled. For these reasons it is essential to remember to install a way for the SUPPLY air to get into the room to replace what is exhausted, since an exhaust fan will create a slight vacuum in a closed room.

In mild climates, they often just put a hole in the outdoor wall with a grille and insect screen, to counteract this, but in colder climates, this allows too much frigid air to enter. In such cases, it may be better to put such a hole through an interior wall to the auditorium or other large room to use the air that is already heated for use there.

The larger picture here is that the building air itself should not be negative, since that will cause large amounts of outdoor air to be inhausted evey time a door is opened, and in winter that will mean cold drafts, and in summer, hot ones that will cause increase in air conditioning costs and higher humidity. Since furnaces/boilers and anything else vented to the outdoors will create such a negative pressure (slight vacuum) it is essential that outdoor supply ducts be brought to any such source and with suitable grilles and insect screens on both intake and outflow openings. Few of us have fireplaces these days, but for those being built they are providing closed channels in the chimney from its base outdoors, into the hearth where such masonry ducts supply outdoor air to eliminate the negative pressure formed by the fire draft in the flue which draws outdoor supply air in through window and door frames and other spots if there is no provision for air supply to the hearth. Such accidently drawn air accounts for many of the cold drafts experienced in buildings without air SUPPLY vents. Any gas appliance (water heater, stove, etc.) will automatically draw air in order to exhause its smoke/fumes. The vent hoods over grills exhaust a vast amount of air, and better installations have air supply make up blowers/heaters to counteract any negative pressure built up by these hoods. Bathrooms often have vents, but few have the supply source to make them effective. Remember that any vent to or from the auditorium will transmit noise, so plan for masonry ducts to absorb sound, or use commercial duct silencers if need be.

The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Coinditioning Engineers ( www.ashrae.org ) on their BOOKSTORE link has several publications that explain this subject and carry specifications for exhaust for theatre situations, among others. It is also wise to note their recommendation of using SWIVEL DIRECTIONAL Exhaust HOODS for outdoor mounting. These are necessry to stop a stiff wind from blowing into or across an open vent and cause it to form a backdraft which can blow out burners or just force bad air back into the building (and they also keep rain out of the stack and blower). In lesser winds, such non-directional hoods on vents merely stop exhausting if the wind pressure exceeds the pressure of the exhaust blowers, which are then bucked, and their lives shortened. Such Swiveling, Directional vent hoods are available from www.grainger.com and others, and should definitely be used on all vent stacks! The more you pay for one, the better the bearings will be and the longer they will turn in the wind, which is why they have a 'fin' on them to make them turn to face downwind on their swivel/turntable base. They may look a little 'industrial' to you, but better them than non-functioning inhausts/exhausts, especially since such systems are usually run day and night and are forgotten through the years!

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited June 04, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by jimor (edited June 04, 2003).]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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