Banner
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: DCI Enforcement

DCI Enforcement 15 May 2012 23:34 #38469

  • howlie
  • howlie's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: 0
Hey all!

Things are looking pretty good for us to purchase this two screen in the Boise, ID area. We're currently looking at some Christie projectors. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with digital systems and DCI? After you got your system in when did the studios or whoever send someone to check your system and make sure it was DCI compliant? The Christie projectors we're looking at are DCI compliant. I just don't want to be blindsided by some weird "inspection" problem that DCI has for these digital systems. I want to have all my T's crossed and my I's dotted so I don't get shut down or something. This DCI stuff is so new that it seems not to many really know how it works, even the digital system dealers like Christie can't really give me a straight answer.

- Jordon
Last Edit: 15 May 2012 23:36 by howlie.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 03:44 #38470

  • BusyBee
  • BusyBee's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 194
  • Thank you received: 10
  • Karma: 7
Who is doing your installation? I'd recommend ACE and they'd be able to answer these types of questions for you.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 16:14 #38471

  • howlie
  • howlie's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: 0
ACE who? ACE Hardware? ACE Group? American Council for Exercise? I've never heard of ACE so I don't know what to look for to find their information.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 16:20 #38473

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5077
  • Thank you received: 45
  • Karma: 16
www.cinequip.com/ American Cinema Equipment have a great reputation and do excellent work. DCI. imho, just means it has been manufactured to those standards, if it is a dci projector, there will not be an inspection. It's really that the thing will not work if it isn't dci. It will not take a "hard drive" or a download and it will not project and integrate with the server etc.
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 17:13 #38474

  • howlie
  • howlie's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: 0
No inspection? Well that's interesting because as long as a projector reads KDM files what else would stop it from playing a movie? I know several projectors that read KDM files but don't have full DCI compliance. They are compliant with some areas of the regulations but not all so DCI hasn't approved them yet. I figured since they read KDM files then there must be some sort of physical inspection done on a theatre's equipment to make sure that theatre is using DCI compliant equipment. How else would you enforce it if one can still buy a projector that plays KDM files but isn't DCI compliant?

I'm starting to see some holes in this DCI compliance nonsense. Maybe this is why no one, including Christie, has been able to give me a straight answer.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 19:36 #38475

  • BusyBee
  • BusyBee's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 194
  • Thank you received: 10
  • Karma: 7
Christie is a projector, not a server. You need both. The cheap projectors you've been told about aren't compatible with the servers that use a KDM to unlock and play a DCP.

Christie is likely not giving you straight answers because your questions don't make sense.

Another great place to read up on the technological side of this business is www.film-tech.com.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 16 May 2012 22:31 #38476

  • howlie
  • howlie's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: 0
You are correct. My questions were not making clear sense. I was a little confused on exactly how the setup works. I've been doing some research today and have a better understanding now. However even with what I understand now it still doesn't make sense why DCI wouldn't inspect a theatres equipment. The projectors I'm speaking of have the server built into them and all you need is the software to open KDM files and DCPs. I honestly think they're more secure than DCI approved systems because there isn't an external server and the DCPs can be sent right to the projector. Everything is internalized into one machine where only the administrator has access to it. I honestly don't understand why they wouldn't be DCI approved unless DCI really is a monopoly trying to control the cinema side of film-making.

IMO I think the whole DCI thing is a farce and won't pan out how Hollywood thinks it will. You can't hold back the free market as much as they want to and not have consequences. In fact, my best friend happens to be a lawyer and after I read the official regulations of DCI I showed him. He thinks the whole thing is illegal and is surprised DCI hasn't been sued yet by some of the smaller theatres. Interesting to think about...

Well looks like I'll need to go do some more research on a server and software to go with my Christie projector.
Last Edit: 16 May 2012 22:46 by howlie.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 18 May 2012 18:26 #38491

  • rodeojack
  • rodeojack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1255
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: 2
Interesting commentary here... always is, really.

The reality of our (and your) situation is this: You have to have a projector that is capable of taking the encrypted digital cinema package from the supplied hard drive, feed it to the projector and, with the separately provided KDM decryption key, turn the gobbledygook into a movie. This means you have to have a projector that has some relationship with the DCI standard. Currently, that means a Christie, NEC, Sony or Barco digital cinema projector and a compatible server, made by one of a small number of manufacturers.

Right now, there are no other options for you, if you want to play mainstream content from the big studios. Research all you want, but if the machines do not meet the compliance requirments of the studios, the movies won't play... or the studios won't serve you... or both. Some people are considering "event projectors" that will work on large screens, but can only play content from satellite or "blu-ray" devices. Those projectors can not play digital cinema content, and probably can not be economically upgraded to do so, if at all.

Disney has gone so far as to publish a list of projectors and servers that their product must be shown with, or they may choose not serve you. Draconian as that might seem, the list includes pretty much all of the digital cinema gear out there. You might look that list up.

In any event, you're not going to dodge the cost factor here. Even a used solution will run you a whole lot of money, assuming you can grab a used machine before someone else gets it.

As for "inspections"... everything I've seen, read and heard indicates that the specification oversight is mainly VPF-driven and is part of the pre-sale process. The installing company checks out your theatre and what it currently has and, with the proposed digital equipment package and any booth modifications, determines whether it meets DCI requirements. If it does, they sign it off and you're good to go. On the other hand, if you're not going for VPFs, then you can buy anything you want and feed the audio into a bull horn, if you like. If the projectors/servers are compliant, then the serial numbers go to the studios and away you go.
Last Edit: 18 May 2012 18:32 by rodeojack.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 18 May 2012 22:27 #38499

  • howlie
  • howlie's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: 0
Thanks for the insight on this topic rodeojack. That's why I love these forums.

Am I the only one that thinks the cost factor is way too high for the technology involved? I mean we live in the digital age now. Digital video software and hardware is a new thing. On that note am I the only one that thinks that DCI is illegal by only allowing certain companies to compete in a market? If anyone disagrees I would love to hear your opinion on the subject.

rodeojack, I'm curious about your last comment about serial numbers going out to the studios. Do the studios require you report the serial numbers on your hardware? Does this have to do with them creating KDM files for the movies they send you?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 19 May 2012 17:58 #38500

  • leeler
  • leeler's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1346
  • Thank you received: 12
  • Karma: 12
yes, this stuff is expensive, but consider that they are making specialized equipment with proprietary hardware and software and instead of selling it to millions of consumers they are selling it to thousands instead. That R&D and time involved costs lots of money and so, yes, it is expensive.

As far as the serial numbers are concerned thay have to do with the KDMs and if they have the wrong serial number it won't "unlock" the file and you'll be dead in the water.
"What a crazy business"
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: DCI Enforcement 31 May 2012 22:11 #38561

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5077
  • Thank you received: 45
  • Karma: 16
If no VPF ....I've had computer genius types tell me they could work around the projector but you'd still have to have a server and get a "film" and THEN try working around it..... someday perhaps but now? NO>
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.175 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction