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TOPIC: Log and maintence books.

Log and maintence books. 10 Jan 2010 20:57 #33093

  • Filmfisher
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I am trying to find out how many people are using a log book to write down problems that arise from the projection room. ie: sound, film, etc.
If so, what is the format that you use in which you have the most luck using?
I am attempting to get my projectionists to be accountable and make sure that problems that arise will not go unnoticed. In the past this has been a problem when something as come up and no one said anything.
Also, when it comes to our Simplex machine and Sanyo digital equipment what time of maintenance do you find most effective in performing daily, weekly monthly.
If anyone would like to share what they do it would be great.
I am scheduling a meeting in a few days and would like to institute some new policies.
B)
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Re:Log and maintence books. 06 Feb 2010 00:32 #33276

  • techman707
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Filmfisher wrote:
I am attempting to get my projectionists to be accountable and make sure that problems that arise will not go unnoticed. In the past this has been a problem when something as come up and no one said anything.

Also, when it comes to our Simplex machine and Sanyo digital equipment what time of maintenance do you find most effective in performing daily, weekly monthly.
B)

Before I retired I was responsible for all the maintenenance and installations for a theatre circuit. From experience, I can tell you that logs DO NOT work, especially in theatres with 2 or more projectionists. What happens is that the "log" just becomes page after page of one liners like "Everything is running ok". When a vacation or relief projectionist comes in, he either fails to wrote anything, or writes what looks like the beginning of Gone with the Wind. I havee found that the most effective way to deal with the problem is to make ONE projectionist responsible, by paying him a few dollars more to oversee the equipment and make regular service adjustments that become necessary. He also needs to oversee any parts (and spare xenon bulbs) that need to be on hand for emergencies.

As for maintenance, the film projectors should be cleaned daily (or more if running a film that flakes). While there are more things that should be checked, weekly and monthly, unless they have been trained to do them, they are best left to the maintenance person (assuming one exists). There's not much the projectionist can do for video projectors except to keep them clean and change the bulb when required. Take it from me,asking them (or attempting to force them) to do anything more is just asking for trouble.
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Re:Log and maintence books. 06 Feb 2010 01:34 #33278

  • trackfood
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If you have qualified people, or at least capable people, the idea of a "log book" is great. Just get them in the habit of writing in it, when things are "off". Even if its something like the sound goes out on proj. 6 midshow, that may be a hint of something, or lights flicker in aud. 3 before show, or no digital sound after reel 3 in aud 5. who knows, but if its documented, hopefully someone with the know-how will be able to check it out, maybe its just a print, or maybe faulty equipment....Theoretically, it should be easy to track, IF ITS DOCUMENTED. So many times things go unnoticed because people don't bother to tell someone else until its been going on, or its to late.
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