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TOPIC: D-Cinema Dead?

D-Cinema Dead? 12 Dec 2008 16:07 #30520

  • ttroidl
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Anyone else see the article about D-Cin being dead and the funding has dried up for at least the next 4-5 years???

If so, maybe by then we will have better options than we do currently!

4 years in technology is an eternity!

:)
tony.
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 12 Dec 2008 18:08 #30521

  • leeler
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could you please post the article?

That would be SWEET :woohoo:
"What a crazy business"
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 12 Dec 2008 23:22 #30525

  • jacker5
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I know a senior projectionist and becasue of the recession all new instalments of digitial have been stopped for at least 5 years. There updating the 35mm projectors and no new digitial instalations are planeed!
This is NY a top market!
So no rush on digitial guys!
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 13 Dec 2008 13:06 #30529

  • rufusjack
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Here is an article:

www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTV...1130?s_name=&no_ads=

The movie business isn't recession-proof, after all


Lauren Streib, Forbes.com

Updated: Sun. Nov. 30 2008 7:22 AM ET

Judging by the box office -- a record-setting US$70 million opening for "Quantum of Solace," fans camping out for "Twilight" and a blockbuster holiday season ahead -- things seem great in Hollywood. But look away from the glow of the screen, and Tinseltown gets a lot darker.

All of the 10 highest-grossing studios, which control 91 per cent of U.S. market share have scaled back or combined their operations in recent months. This year's top-grossing studio, Warner Brothers Entertainment, shuttered two of its independent arms, Picturehouse and Warner Independent Pictures, and absorbed a third, New Line Cinema, in an effort to cut costs. Their total film output will drop to 20 films this year, down 25 per cent from last year's slate. Paramount and 20th Century Fox made similar cuts.

In Pictures/In Depth:



It isn't the terrible economy -- yet. People are still going to movies. The big problem is Wall Street. Without money from private equity and big investment banks, which injected an estimated $10 to $18 billion into Hollywood in the last four years, studios have had to change the way they do business -- fast. "I would be very dubious for Hollywood as we know it surviving," says David Thomson, film critic and author of Have You Seen ...?

The American film industry "can't sustain much higher growth rates or attract capital at the same low rates the way they could a year or two ago," says Harold Vogel, CEO of Vogel Capital Management and author of Entertainment Industry Economics. "All the risk has been repriced."

As financing costs escalate, so will production costs. That means fewer films. Though the reduction ripple won't hit the box office until 2010, the number of productions will be down 5 per cent to 10 per cent over the next few years, predicts Vogel. The total number of feature films in wide release climbed from 478 in 2000 to 631 last year, a 32 per cent increase. The number of movie tickets sold increased by only 1 per cent in that same period.

The independent film industry may shrink even more. According to remarks made by Mark Gill, CEO of The Film Department, at the L.A. Film Festival last June, of the 5,000 films submitted to Sundance last year only "maybe five" would make money. There were 477 independent films made in 2007, according to the Independent Film & Television Alliance, each costing an average of $16.5 million to make.

"There's been an open spigot of money flowing into Hollywood, and the pictures are killing each other," says John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theatre Owners. "We can't handle the number of movies we're getting right now."

International financing has increased importance. Recently, Abu Dhabi Media announced it will spend $1 billion over the next five years on U.S.-produced feature films. Steven Spielberg's new venture is being funded with $1.5 billion in equity and debt from India's Reliance ADA group.

The theater industry is also feeling the pinch as it transitions from film to digital projection. "The traditional funding sources are currently shut down," says Bud Mayo, CEO of Access IT, a third-party integration company that has converted 70 per cent of the digital screens in the U.S. Last fall, Access IT announced plans to furnish 10,000 additional screens in by the first quarter 2011. They've installed eight so far this year.

Loans from investment banks provided companies like Access IT with the credit to install the new equipment, while studios essentially pay off that debt through a fee -- usually around $1,000 -- for every digital copy they ship to the movie theaters. "As long as the movie theaters show movies, we're going to get paid," says Mayo. "We're very bullish on the industry."

Though the nationwide overhaul would cost near $3 billion, it would save distributors and theater owners nearly a billion dollars a year by replacing the cumbersome, costly film reels with digital versions. Currently 5,200 screens, or 13 per cent of all the screens in the U.S., are digital.

Theaters without digital technology will be at a loss in the coming years as consumer demand for, and output of, 3-D movies increases. Starting in 2010, about 20 per cent of all wide-release films will be in 3-D, a format that can only be shown on digital projectors with an additional converter.

Fithian remains an optimist. "History clearly shows that the cinema business tends to do better during recessionary times," says Fithian. "We have to have good movies to get people to come to the cinema." Maybe just not so many.
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 13 Dec 2008 20:20 #30530

  • Mike
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I would file this under Mark Twain's obit "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."

The money for financing the big expansion is not available,. Now. AIT received 9 more million funding from provate cap. Their burn rate? Who knows but 9 mill sounds light. Bottom line: digital is a train that keeps rolling all night long: when it gets to you and me who knows. I have owned one theatre for 15 years. In 15 years there will be digital in my theatres.
Michael Hurley
Impresario
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 14 Dec 2008 14:44 #30531

  • leeler
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I'll be ready in fifteen years. Next year or the year after.....not so much.
"What a crazy business"
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 15 Dec 2008 00:47 #30537

  • slapintheface
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THIS TOPIC IS CRAZY.Dead ..I dont think so.........No new theater in a chain is opening with 35 mm...Digital slowed but far from dead.....35 mm was given CPR but the patient will die of a heart attack.
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 15 Dec 2008 09:45 #30541

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Even if it just delays things by a couple of years that would be very welcome news, for me and a bunch of other people I know.

Viva the credit crunch!
"What a crazy business"
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 17 Dec 2008 13:00 #30555

  • cuemarks
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The tech who installed our digitals told me he is very busy installing D-Cinema
projectors in many locations. He also told me they are having a difficult time getting enough silver screens for 3-D systems. Cuemarks
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 26 Jul 2009 02:20 #31976

  • Dragon1473
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We just had 2 digitals installed at the 8-plex I work, bringing us up to three. Last I heard the company had even further intentions to expand. Hope its not dying out, as it is bringing a little life back in to my theater
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 26 Jul 2009 02:37 #31979

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The reports you hear or read regarding the installation of digital equipment are for the most part in medium and large city corporate big-boys houses. Small towns and rural areas won't see digital anytime in the near future. Film will be with us for many years.
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 26 Jul 2009 21:41 #31981

  • Ken Layton
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One of my local "big boys" theater chains is already JUNKING their two-year-old digital video projector because it's literally falling apart.

I heard the replacement video projector (brand new) died in the middle of a Friday night show and could not be repaired all weekend. The house was completely down a total of 4 days straight!
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 26 Jul 2009 23:50 #31983

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That's insane! I know we had a bit of a glitch in ours this weekend, but the problem was identified and resolved quite quickly. What kind of digital projectors were they?
Last Edit: 27 Jul 2009 00:03 by Dragon1473.
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 27 Jul 2009 00:13 #31984

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I'm not all that surprised by the failure of new electronic equipment after only a few years or even out of the box. Most of us are probably familiar with the idea that electronic failures can happen at any time without warning. There really is no way of knowing when something will fail.

If dependability is no better than that, how do the distributors expect smaller exhibitors to take the risks necessary to make the swich to digital?

I'd be curious to hear other comments on the reliability and dependability of digital projection systems... good or bad.
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Re:D-Cinema Dead? 27 Jul 2009 00:51 #31985

  • Dragon1473
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I do agree that yes, that when something/place becomes completely dependent on new technology, there are a great number of risks as well. As far as protecting the ingested contents on the hard drive? A mirror raid can help a little with that. God forbid something happens to one drive, the mirror takes it place, an error is reported, and the bad drive can be repaired/replaced. I believe that the actual projector itself is where the majority of the risk lies. I feel that proper monitoring of all statistics (motherboard temps, lamp temps, various readouts, etc.) can help prevent problems, but nothing is foolproof. Sometime parts go or no reason. For example: my sister bought a brand new laptop to use up at school. 5 months in, her motherboard fries itself. She was never abusive with it, and took plenty good care of it. Just happens.

I myself am a tech-geek. I love and enjoy reading number and statistics like those. In fact, I wind up checking temperature readouts and checking error logs quite frequently. As I stated before, our projectors and servers have been pretty reliable and any minor problems have been fixed quite quickly, resulting in minimal downtime (in fact, I do not think we have had to cancel a single digital show due to server/projector problems.)

However, our theater does have a back-up plan just in case: We still have the 35mm projectors installed and operational along side each digital. Never know when may need it.
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