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TOPIC: Effecting Film

Effecting Film 28 May 2004 11:23 #21900

  • take2
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Summer is here and I'm wondering about the air conditioning in our booth. With the circulation of the air and the dust that will be flying around I'm concerned about the effect it will have on the film. How about the the cool air v.s. the heat generated by the projector.
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Re: Effecting Film 28 May 2004 13:50 #21901

  • rodeojack
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How people handle this is all over the place. You'll need to select a combination that suits you, your budget and the climate in your area.

You can air condition your booth. However, remember that (most of the time) you're pulling a lot of air out of the room & out the lamphouse exhaust stacks. If the incoming air that replaces it is not cool enough for your liking, you'll have to put in an air conditioner that's big enough to handle the constant exchange... which can get spendy. If you have to go this way, invest in a unit that will bring in outside air without a refrigerator until the air reaches a certain temperature (an economizer). That will save you a lot of electricity.

Also keep in mind that refrigerated air conditioners will remove humidity from your booth. I don't recall the figure offhand (the Film=Tech board isn't cooperating this morning)... but John Pytlak has it at his fingertips. If the humidity gets too low and you're print isn't Kodak's new product, the static can cause you some problems.

Swamp coolers can put too much humidity in the room... also with negative effects on the film.


If the outside air is cool enough that pushing a lot of it through your booth will work, a good blower and filter system could be all you need.

In my case, I add to that with Kelmar film cleaners and Film Guard on the media pads to keep my prints clean. I also have platter covers, which makes a huge difference during the dusty season

Good luck!
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Re: Effecting Film 29 May 2004 06:06 #21902

  • jimor
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It is true that air conditioning/cooling a booth that has continuous exhaust (and there MUST be an intake supply to make the exhaust work) will be a pricey situation. In any case, you might want to look into electrostatic air clearners and ionizers that trap or precipitate dirt out of the air. One of these might be placed in the inhaust (supply) air intake since it would do much better than a mechanical filter (pad).

Years ago, the old movie palaces were built with elaborate washed air systems with both chiller and blast coils following the water spray washing to make the temperature desired as well as to dehumidify to some extent, but those systems are long disabeled if they exist at all, and would probably be cost prohibitive these days, anyway. Best Wishes with a knotty problem.
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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Re: Effecting Film 01 Jun 2004 01:08 #21903

  • Adam Fraser
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Jimor, we still use one of those systems with much success. It takes up a 10 by 12' room in the basement and the boiler a 10' by 18' room itself.

The chiller (a 6' by 10' radiator, similar to a car's) acts as the front wall of this room. There is a fresh air intake or a recirc. intake that we can open or close. Two fans in the room pull air through the radiator and heat/cool the room and push the air through ducting. The water is ground water that is a closed system in the winter and open in the summer. After going through the system it waters our lawn in the summer.

The water spray washing was done away with long ago though, but it was in the original advertising for the theatre's opening (called a de-pollenizer in the advertising). Replaced with filters placed in front of the radiators.

On even 100 degree days in the summer we could get the auditorium/booth well below 70 if we wanted to.

The downside: You have to know the system very well to operate it, so that precludes staff from running it.

It can be very expensive to repair the system as not many people know how to fix them.
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Re: Effecting Film 01 Jun 2004 02:52 #21904

  • outaframe
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Yes, I too had a chilled water AC system when I bought the theater... In fact there were two, because there was an abandoned one on the roof, which I did away with immediately... I used the system in the basement until 1974: It had an evaporator core the 6x10 size you referred to, but it was made of 1/2" copper tubing (8 rows thick) with closey spaced aluminum fins, and was fed by a 2" city water supply pipe... It was relatively simple: the water control was through an electric motor driven gate valve, controlled by a switch located in the office stairway... There were 3 large squirrelcage blowers drawing either filtered outside or recirculated air through it, and dumping into the ductwork... City water mains are buried deep enough that they maintain about a 55 degree F temperature, and since the aluminum fin evaporator was a closed system, it also dehumidified the air passing through the fins, because they were so cold in comparison... It worked exceptionally well, but as water rates continued to rise, and the (warmed) exhaust water was also subject to sewerage treatment charges, it became too expensive to operate... The evaporator core is still there (but disconnected) and I now use the same blowers, but feed in refrigerated air from a large regular AC evaporator system... I once considered driving a shallow well to feed the evaporator, and dumping the exhaust water into another pipe back into the ground water table, but the expense and permits required to do that made the regular AC the least expensive way to go... These old water chilled systems were a very good setup BEFORE water and sewerage rates went sky high!...

[This message has been edited by outaframe (edited June 01, 2004).]

[This message has been edited by outaframe (edited June 01, 2004).]
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Re: Effecting Film 01 Jun 2004 13:18 #21905

  • John Pytlak
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Ideally, try to keep the relative humidity in the projection room between 50% and 60% RH. Too dry (less than 35%) invites static problems and curl, too moist and the film emulsion gets sticky and soft. Dampness also causes equipment to rust/corrode, and can be an issue with high voltage electronics (e.g., xenon ignitors).

Temperature is more critical for the electronic equipment than the film. Aim for 20-25 Celsius, but whatever is comfortable for people is fine for the film.

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
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