Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Booth making-up movies
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: making-up movies

making-up movies 16 Feb 2004 16:52 #21802

  • leeler
  • leeler's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1346
  • Thank you received: 12
  • Karma: 12
When you are making up movies on a platter do you watch the film as it goes by for problems? Do you hold the edges? Do you space-out?
"What a crazy business"
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 16 Feb 2004 17:55 #21803

  • outaframe
  • outaframe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 672
  • Karma: 0
Hi LEE, whether you're setting up a print for a platter OR reel-to-reel, it's always a very good idea to cup the film slightly between your thumb and middle finger to detect bad slices, tears, sprocket damage, etc... You're supposed to do this while wearing a lintless white cotton glove... Even a new print will often have poor lab splices, and I'm never comfortable running a print that I haven't checked this way, first... As to spacing out, feel free to daydream about warm sunny beaches, a new Porsche, or whatever else turns 'ya on, until you detect a problem, then it's back to reality to fix it... Have fun!... ;-}
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 16 Feb 2004 17:57 #21804

  • Large
  • Large's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1074
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
We build up our films on a bench. If the film is used we run the film between our fingers to find all the splices and visually check them. If the print is brand new we may just wind it on to a reel. The problem with this is that you miss the lab splices which should be removed.

After we have built up the film on to the platter a manager usually watches in the wee wee hours to make sure it is correctly assembled and is free of defects.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 16 Feb 2004 20:28 #21805

  • muviebuf
  • muviebuf's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 686
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
As I inspect my film since I don't have media film cleaners, I use a special cloth with Filmguard to lubricate the film.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 16 Feb 2004 20:36 #21806

  • leeler
  • leeler's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1346
  • Thank you received: 12
  • Karma: 12
Well, that's what I was thinking you all were going to say but nobody mentioned that to me during my "exhaustive" training. I think I have just been lucky to this point as I haven't had anything like a lab splice get through (at least not get through and then fail). I did just get a film cleaner and have been using it and Filmguard so, at least, the film has been cleaned. And I inspect it somewhat during make-up but I haven't been holding it at the bench or anything. I also do a pre-screening and go back and fix something if it looks out of whack. I'll start paying more attention during make-up, though and checking for problems. So, you could say, I've just been spacing out......but no more, I promise.
"What a crazy business"
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 25 Feb 2004 14:53 #21807

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Even a brand new print could have hidden damage that could cause a film break or audience dissatisfaction. Winding the film with a slight cup between the fingers is easier to do on a rewind bench, rather than the makeup table. Certainly the lab splices should be examined and removed if they are questionable or not on the frameline.

While winding through the print, feel for nicked edges, torn perfs, or splices. Also LOOK for obvious damage like safelight fog (areas with an overall blue/cyan density buildup), missing tracks or pictures (printer light failure), or obvious scratches or dirt buildup.

Here is a Kodak tutorial about film handling and inspection:
http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/technical/hand.shtml

It's always a good idea to prescreen prints, checking all the sound formats you use. Your employees should be given a form to record any problems with picture or sound, linked to which reels might need replacement.

John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 26 Feb 2004 23:39 #21808

  • Avalon
  • Avalon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: 0
For years I ran the film I was building up between my fingers. A few years ago I had a shipping reel fragment on me. I watched a huge piece of it hit the wall then bounce across the booth. That could'a gone bad, thinks me. Then I saw the blood sprayed on the nice white formica of the AW2. Then I thought, Yes, this is going to suck. It did. If you're building from a shipping reel, ck it from cracks or loose parts before sticking your fingers, eyes, significant other, etc near it. These days when I run the film thru my fingers, it's moving much slower than I used to spool it.
Paul Turner
Avalon Cinema
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 01 Mar 2004 13:57 #21809

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Eye protection is always a good idea when working with fast moving rotating objects. In a darkened projection room, there is also a risk of running into something and poking your eye.


John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 01 Mar 2004 17:19 #21810

  • leeler
  • leeler's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1346
  • Thank you received: 12
  • Karma: 12
Well, I used a paper towel with filmguard sprayed on it and then held that onto the edges of the film. It gets loads of dust and crap off the film and keeps it off my hands. I do come across the occassional splice where there wouldn't normally be one and I check it and possibly replace it. It is kind of tedious but I agree that it's worth it. I played 'Cold Mountain' the other week and it was nine long reels worth. Making up that movie took about four hours.

I think, in my situation, the problems I'm most likely to come across are from the previous user of the film and not from the lab. On several occassions I've come across indentations in the film about two frames away from a previous splice. It looks to me like the projectionist before me needs to adjust his/her splicer as the round indentations could be from the screw heads on their splicer not being tightened down. I mentioned it to Technicolor and they seemed interested and I thought they may do something about it. It happened again (!) last week and this time I mentioned it to ETS and they said "we don't do anything about that". It sure is tough trying to do things right when you're surrounded by people who don't really care......

OK, rant over......

"What a crazy business"
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: making-up movies 02 Mar 2004 01:52 #21811

  • outaframe
  • outaframe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 672
  • Karma: 0
Believe it or not, for the most part the prints we are receiving today are generally in MUCH better condition than ones we used to have to deal with... To appreciate this, you would need to have been in the booth in the 60's and 70's... There are MANY reasons for this including that there were fewer pictures in release then, and FAR fewer prints made for each feature... Pictures opened first in major markets, where they sometimes played for months before the prints passed down to the next level... The print you ended up with could have played in maybe a half dozen other locations before you received it, and varied in condition from near pristine, to an absolute wreck... It would take a book the size of the Sears catalog to detail all the horror stories I can recall about the condition of some prints I received then, and there was usually no recouse other than to repair it and make the best of what you ended up with... I spent literally nights tweeking up the major repairs that had to be made first, just to get some of them on screen... Proper dry scraped cement splices take a minimum of 2 1/2 minutes each, including drying time, and some films required HUNDREDS, so its not hard to see why it required so much time to set up a print... Today's polyester film is much stronger that the older acetate stock, and a good sharp well alligned tape splicer can make better splices in a fraction of the time that cement splices required, but ONE thing hasn't changed: any complaints you make regarding print condition will fall on deaf ears... They don't really care, regardless of the amount of lip service they pay you about it... You booked a print, and whatever condition it's in, as long as you received one, they have completed their obligation, in their eyes... Cuping the film between your fingers during setup is something I came up with on my own, just as a faster and better way to detect damage... Years later I found reference to doing it (with the white cotton glove) but I still don't wear the glove, because it's easier to do with just your bare fingers... I also came up with the idea of cleaning the occasional really dirty, or oily print with a pad of folded cloth lightly wetted with naptha, long before Filmguard came along... I have never tried Filmguard, and it might work even better, but the naptha does the job, and is probably much less expensive... Necessity IS the mother of invention...

[This message has been edited by outaframe (edited March 02, 2004).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.184 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction