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TOPIC: Adding a trailer?

Adding a trailer? 19 Dec 2003 10:34 #21746

  • leeler
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I'm sure this must have come up in the past but I have a couple questions regarding trailers.

First of all, I have a platter system and I'm interested to know if there is a procedure for adding a trailer after the movie has been made up.

Secondly, how can you tell where the frame lines are on the black film before a trailer? I often-times get it wrong. Then, I get the movie all made-up and find that I made a splice halway through a frame on the second trailer and I'm back to the first question again. How do I fix that when the whole print is made up?

"What a crazy business"
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Re: Adding a trailer? 19 Dec 2003 10:49 #21747

  • John Pytlak
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Check out Film-Tech's "Tips", which has lots of information:
http://www.film-tech.com/tips/presentation.html

"Trailer changes. It is amazing to me how many people do not change out trailers properly. There are a few different acceptable ways of accomplishing this task, but if your particular method involves the film on the floor at any point or the trailers are not being run the following show, then I recommend the following procedure.

In this example, the third trailer will be changed out. First, remove the center ring. Second, locate the splice joining the second and third trailer together. This is easily seen by angling yourself against the reflected light on the edge of the film. (If you find this too difficult, then a small piece of paper can be inserted during the take-up of the previous show at the two splices. Inserting cores or “boots” is definitely not a recommendation as the film will not feed consistently and the weight dispersion will be off center the next show, possibly causing the print to wrap or be thrown.) Push the leader and first two trailers gently toward the brain at the splice. Tear the splice and place this “loop” of film on an empty platter. Splice the new third trailer to this loop and without adding any back-tension while holding the trailer with your hand, let it wind onto the loop of film as the platter is spinning slowly. Next you will need to remove the old third trailer by locating the splice joining it to the fourth trailer, tearing that splice and removing the trailer. This trailer “loop” can then be wound back onto a core later. Finally, splice the loop containing the first three trailers to the fourth one and gently lay it back into the center of the film roll, being careful not to create any twists. If this loop does not fit easily inside the film roll, an inward bulge (towards the brain) to accommodate any excess film is acceptable. Note: on Christie platters an outward bulge is also acceptable. This procedure will work for any trailer changes except the first trailer. Since the weight of just one trailer is not enough to hold its shape, the leader should be removed and attached to the new first trailer on the bench and then loaded onto a center ring before dropping it back into the roll.

Winding and handling of trailers. So now you’ve got that removed trailer in loop format and it needs to be wound back onto a core. If your theatre has the standard Kelmar rewind table, then this is the best method and it is quite easy.

Hang the loop of film on the “auto stop” roller. Pull the tail end of it over to the core (on the flange), secure it and turn the motor slowly to a moderate speed. The roller will spin as the film is pulled off of the top and wind quickly and easily back onto the core without any tangling. If your theatre has a different rewind table, but the reels do hang over the front edge, a roller with ball bearings can be placed on the supply spindle to achieve a similar effect. Never pull on the end of the film roll after it is wound back up (either on a reel or a core) because that will create “cinch mark” scratches. For those of you who don’t know what that is, they are the tiny “dash scratches” flashing randomly around the image."

I find that Film-Tech is the best place for discussing and finding information on the "technical" side of the business. BigScreenBiz is great for the "business" side of running a theatre.


John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Cell: +1 585-781-4036 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
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Re: Adding a trailer? 19 Dec 2003 13:35 #21748

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Goldberg makes an excellent product called a Split Reel Trailer Drop in Reel. They cost about $75 from any cinema supplier and are worth their wieght in Gold. I used to project at a 12-plex and we had to change out all the trailers on Thursday night. One projectionist could change out all the trailers on all 12 films in one rack of shows.
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Re: Adding a trailer? 19 Dec 2003 14:55 #21749

  • outaframe
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HELLO, LEE <> Burney asked about locating frame lines on black leader when she was playing Scary Movie, a few weeks ago... There are 2 ways to do it: frame lines are located in the web of film between every 4th sprocket hole... You have to go into the body of the film where the frame lines are visable, and make a tiny scratch on the non-soundtrack side of the emulsion, every 4th sprocket hole (web) from that point to where you want to splice < OR > you can allign a scrap of film with visable frame lines (or a scrap of Academy leader) parallel to the last visable frame line on the trailer (or print) you want to identify the frame lines on, and use it to identify the correct web in the black...

Adding/removing film & correcting splices in film already on a platter:
I'm a reel-to-reel guy with some LIMITED platter experience, but here's how I have done it without any problems... As the film is picking up on the takeup platter, drop 3 or 4 blocks (styrofoam, wood, etc. - about 1 1/4 inch cubes) equally spaced at the point where you need to add film, or correct a splice... When the film is finished, carefully lift out the film and repair the splice or splice in the additional trailer, etc. and carefully drop the repaired/additional film back into the space left where the blocks were... You might need to double the blocks IF the trailer is especially long... You'll need to keep an eye on things the first time you play the modified film, but when it picks up on the takeup table, everything will be back to normal... Have fun!...
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Re: Adding a trailer? 19 Dec 2003 19:32 #21750

A 3' long strip of 1'tall by 3/4" thick piece of foam rubber is very handy for feeding into the print as the splice approaches the platter to allow acces to the splice. It also keeps the wind of the film more ore less round

Also never scratch in frame lines use a greese pencil
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Re: Adding a trailer? 21 Dec 2003 14:00 #21751

  • leeler
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okay, I didn't read the post and I panicked so here's the method I used to add a trailer (and then go back and cut 3/4 of a frame out). Before I mention it know this about me. I never, ever do things the easy way. I must be masochistic or something. Anyway, I threaded the platter through the wrap detector and then, rather then going to the projector with it I just sent it to the take-up platter. I held up the "W" of the platter to control the speed and then babysat the platter until the section I needed to splice came through. Then I stopped it, spliced it, and continued along through the feature. It took probably 40 minutes and I went along at a quick ,but not overly fast pace. I have a paranoia about damaging either my equipment or the film. Is there anything wrong with this method?

Leeler
"What a crazy business"
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Re: Adding a trailer? 21 Dec 2003 17:45 #21752

  • outaframe
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LEE <> Since the film was already back on the pickup platter, and you wanted to fix it BEFORE you showed it again, I can't see anything wrong with doing it the way you did, other than it takes a while... Like I said, I have LIMITED platter experience, so there may be a better way which an expert can describe, but what you did is SAFE and that's not all bad... Having a healthy respect for your equipment and the print will never get you in any trouble, so I'd say you did fine!...
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Re: Adding a trailer? 30 Dec 2003 15:17 #21753

  • Driordan
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Potts and Strong Platters sell a ring that is made for inserting/changing trailers, after a showing. It's a bigger diameter; you put it on your take-up platter when you show a film and it gives you space to "drop in" new trailers that you make up on a regular ring, then splice into the large space left by the trailer ring. You can remove any unwanted trailers easily by pciking them out. Call your supplier; I bought one for around $100 and it has been a great help in changing trailers. Also, if you pick out a trailer, and have a rewind table, (other than your platter table) you can rewind the trailers slow onto a core or reel by holding the trailer loosely in one hand, and looping the outer revolutions first one side and then the other. It's not the best way to rewind a trailer, but if you pick oone out of the center of a platter system and need to get it onto a core or reel, it will work. Just don't let film hit the floor.
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