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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 19 Apr 2011 14:18 #35783

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www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-ct-small-...0419,0,2294998.story

Small theater operators weigh digital conversion
Film prints may become unavailable in 2013 and financing for digital projection technology is winding down, but installation costs are still prohibitive for many of the smallest movie houses.

By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
April 19, 2011
For more than three decades, the Kim family has operated a popular 800-seat neighborhood theater on Crenshaw Boulevard in Gardena.

The single-screen movie house — a rarity anywhere — has weathered multiple storms. It thrived in the 1970s and early 1980s by specializing in Spanish-language movies, until its Mexican film distributor went out of business. The Kims switched to screening conventional Hollywood movies, but soon confronted growing competition from new multiplexes. They adapted by selling lower-priced tickets, catering to budget-conscious families looking for an affordable night out.

Now they face what could be their biggest hurdle: how to foot the bill for a new digital projection system.

"We've been investigating converting to digital, but it's cost prohibitive for us," said Judy Kim, an attorney who manages Gardena Cinema for her parents, who are in their 70s. "You're talking about tens of thousands of dollars for a machine, and you're not sure it's worth putting in that kind of money or whether you're going to get a return on your investment."

After years of delays, the century-old movie exhibition business is finally embracing digital technology. Equipment suppliers can barely keep up with the demand. About 800 to 900 digital screens are being added each month to theaters large and small nationwide, allowing them to screen 3-D movies, beam live sporting and music events and deliver sharper, scratch free images to audiences.

But hundreds of small theater operators such as the Kims have yet to get with the digital program — and may be left out if they don't act soon.

"The pressure is on," said Greg Laemmle, president of Laemmle Theatres, the L.A.-based art house movie chain that is weighing how many digital projectors to install at its eight locations. "We're going to have to jump."

To assist theaters in making the leap, studios are helping to pay for the equipment through so-called virtual print fees. In lieu of making and delivering 35-millimeter film prints — which cost about $1,000 each versus $100 to $200 for a digital print — studios are putting aside the money they save to help theaters buy the equipment they need to convert to digital projection systems.

But that financing is winding down. Under agreements with studios, exhibitors can qualify for the funding only if they install their digital equipment by the end of next year. Film prints — the reels that are threaded through projectors — could become unavailable as early as 2013, according to the National Assn. of Theatre Owners.

With digital distribution, a hard-drive copy of a movie is shipped to the theater, where it is inserted into a server that operates the projection system. In some cases, movies are also transmitted digitally via satellite.

John Fithian, the theater owner group's president, recently issued a dire warning at the industry's annual convention in Las Vegas.

"Simply put, if you don't make the decision to get on the digital train soon, you will be making the decision to get out of the business," Fithian told attendees. "That would be tragic because digital cinema and 3-D have so much to offer."

Overseas, theater operators also are rapidly converting to digital, although studios are expected to continue shipping film prints to some smaller countries for the foreseeable future.

Nearly half of all 39,000 screens in the U.S. are digital, up from just a few thousand in 2007. By year's end, about 23,000 digital screens will have been installed, mostly from expansion by the three largest theater chains: AMC Entertainment Inc., Regal Entertainment Group and Cinemark Holdings Inc. A consortium representing the circuits raised nearly $900 million to finance the rollout.

Despite the rapid expansion, Fithian is nonetheless concerned that several hundred smaller exhibitors — those with 10 or fewer screens — have held off installing digital equipment.

"We've been telling exhibitors for four years that this is coming," Fithian said in an interview. "We don't want people to be left behind."

There are 650 theater companies in the U.S. and Canada with fewer than 100 screens, including 270 with just one screen. Some of these smaller operators believe film won't disappear any time soon. Others can't afford the investment. Digital projectors and accompanying computer hardware and software cost about $65,000 per screen. That doesn't include an additional $4,000 to $8,000 for a special silver screen, which is required on some systems, and approximately $10,000 to $20,000 more for 3-D equipment.

Making such a hefty investment is intimidating to small operators, especially at a time when business has fallen off sharply. Box-office revenue and admissions have dropped more than 20% this year from 2010. Adding to the anxiety are fears that studios will further induce moviegoers to stay away from theaters by offering movies in the home just 60 days after their box-office debuts.

"It's disconcerting that they are really pushing us to spend a lot of money on digital at a time when they are tinkering with the traditional business model, which could jeopardize our business," said David Corwin, president of Metropolitan Theatres Corp., which is investing $5 million to finish converting its 101 screens in the Western U.S. and British Columbia to digital.

Small exhibitors can obtain loans to buy equipment through their local banks, the Small Business Administration, equipment vendors or so-called third party integrators such as Cinedigm Digital Cinema Corp., a New Jersey-based company that buys and installs digital equipment in theaters and collects virtual print fees from distributors to help exhibitors pay back the loans to buy equipment.

"The bottom line is that financing is available to everyone in one way or the other," said Chuck Goldwater, president of Cinedigm's media services group. "What we tell exhibitors is that the clock is ticking."

Some theater owners, however, said they can't shoulder more debt.

Jeff Mexico, who owns a drive-in theater and two cinemas in Salem, Ore., said he was paying down a $200,000 loan he took out to refurbish one of his theaters in 2006 and can't afford to borrow more money.

"I'm just at a point where I can't take on any more debt," he said.

Yet Mexico said he knows he may not have a choice because film may not be around much longer. A stark reminder of that came recently when a distributor told him he couldn't book "Source Code," the action thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal.

"They said, 'We don't have enough film prints.' "

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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 21 Apr 2011 13:41 #35805

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Small theater operators weigh digital conversion

Film prints may become unavailable in 2013 and financing for digital projection technology is winding down, but installation costs are still prohibitive for many of the smallest movie houses.

By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times

April 19, 2011

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For more than three decades, the Kim family has operated a popular 800-seat neighborhood theater on Crenshaw Boulevard in Gardena.

The single-screen movie house — a rarity anywhere — has weathered multiple storms. It thrived in the 1970s and early 1980s by specializing in Spanish-language movies, until its Mexican film distributor went out of business. The Kims switched to screening conventional Hollywood movies, but soon confronted growing competition from new multiplexes. They adapted by selling lower-priced tickets, catering to budget-conscious families looking for an affordable night out.

Now they face what could be their biggest hurdle: how to foot the bill for a new digital projection system.

"We've been investigating converting to digital, but it's cost prohibitive for us," said Judy Kim, an attorney who manages Gardena Cinema for her parents, who are in their 70s. "You're talking about tens of thousands of dollars for a machine, and you're not sure it's worth putting in that kind of money or whether you're going to get a return on your investment."

After years of delays, the century-old movie exhibition business is finally embracing digital technology. Equipment suppliers can barely keep up with the demand. About 800 to 900 digital screens are being added each month to theaters large and small nationwide, allowing them to screen 3-D movies, beam live sporting and music events and deliver sharper, scratch free images to audiences.

But hundreds of small theater operators such as the Kims have yet to get with the digital program — and may be left out if they don't act soon.

"The pressure is on," said Greg Laemmle, president of Laemmle Theatres, the L.A.-based art house movie chain that is weighing how many digital projectors to install at its eight locations. "We're going to have to jump."

To assist theaters in making the leap, studios are helping to pay for the equipment through so-called virtual print fees. In lieu of making and delivering 35-millimeter film prints — which cost about $1,000 each versus $100 to $200 for a digital print — studios are putting aside the money they save to help theaters buy the equipment they need to convert to digital projection systems.

But that financing is winding down. Under agreements with studios, exhibitors can qualify for the funding only if they install their digital equipment by the end of next year. Film prints — the reels that are threaded through projectors — could become unavailable as early as 2013, according to the National Assn. of Theatre Owners.

With digital distribution, a hard-drive copy of a movie is shipped to the theater, where it is inserted into a server that operates the projection system. In some cases, movies are also transmitted digitally via satellite.

John Fithian, the theater owner group's president, recently issued a dire warning at the industry's annual convention in Las Vegas.

"Simply put, if you don't make the decision to get on the digital train soon, you will be making the decision to get out of the business," Fithian told attendees. "That would be tragic because digital cinema and 3-D have so much to offer."

Overseas, theater operators also are rapidly converting to digital, although studios are expected to continue shipping film prints to some smaller countries for the foreseeable future.

Nearly half of all 39,000 screens in the U.S. are digital, up from just a few thousand in 2007. By year's end, about 23,000 digital screens will have been installed, mostly from expansion by the three largest theater chains: AMC Entertainment Inc., Regal Entertainment Group and Cinemark Holdings Inc. A consortium representing the circuits raised nearly $900 million to finance the rollout.

Despite the rapid expansion, Fithian is nonetheless concerned that several hundred smaller exhibitors — those with 10 or fewer screens — have held off installing digital equipment.

"We've been telling exhibitors for four years that this is coming," Fithian said in an interview. "We don't want people to be left behind."

There are 650 theater companies in the U.S. and Canada with fewer than 100 screens, including 270 with just one screen. Some of these smaller operators believe film won't disappear any time soon. Others can't afford the investment. Digital projectors and accompanying computer hardware and software cost about $65,000 per screen. That doesn't include an additional $4,000 to $8,000 for a special silver screen, which is required on some systems, and approximately $10,000 to $20,000 more for 3-D equipment.

Making such a hefty investment is intimidating to small operators, especially at a time when business has fallen off sharply. Box-office revenue and admissions have dropped more than 20% this year from 2010. Adding to the anxiety are fears that studios will further induce moviegoers to stay away from theaters by offering movies in the home just 60 days after their box-office debuts.

"It's disconcerting that they are really pushing us to spend a lot of money on digital at a time when they are tinkering with the traditional business model, which could jeopardize our business," said David Corwin, president of Metropolitan Theatres Corp., which is investing $5 million to finish converting its 101 screens in the Western U.S. and British Columbia to digital.

Small exhibitors can obtain loans to buy equipment through their local banks, the Small Business Administration, equipment vendors or so-called third party integrators such as Cinedigm Digital Cinema Corp., a New Jersey-based company that buys and installs digital equipment in theaters and collects virtual print fees from distributors to help exhibitors pay back the loans to buy equipment.

"The bottom line is that financing is available to everyone in one way or the other," said Chuck Goldwater, president of Cinedigm's media services group. "What we tell exhibitors is that the clock is ticking."

Some theater owners, however, said they can't shoulder more debt.

Jeff Mexico, who owns a drive-in theater and two cinemas in Salem, Ore., said he was paying down a $200,000 loan he took out to refurbish one of his theaters in 2006 and can't afford to borrow more money.

"I'm just at a point where I can't take on any more debt," he said.

Yet Mexico said he knows he may not have a choice because film may not be around much longer. A stark reminder of that came recently when a distributor told him he couldn't book "Source Code," the action thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal.

"They said, 'We don't have enough film prints.' "
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 21 Apr 2011 20:52 #35809

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Prints 3D
Shrek 4359 2372 0.544161505
Toy Story 4028 2463 0.611469712
Despicable 3476 1565 0.45023015
Cats/Dogs 3705 2130 0.574898785
GaHoole 3575 2479 0.693426573
Megamind 3944 2660 0.674442191
Tangled 3603 2450 0.679988898
Narnia 3555 1990 0.559774965
Tron 3451 2392 0.693132425
Green Hornet 3584 2556 0.713169643
Rio 3825 2613 0.683137255
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 04 May 2011 01:07 #35925

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Cinemas threaten to cut films over viewing dispute

By Rob Hastings

Cinema chains could refuse to show major films in a showdown with two leading studios over home viewing.

Warner Bros and 20th Century Fox are expected to launch a premium online video-on-demand service, allowing people to watch movies on their televisions and computers as little as a month after they are released on the big screen.

Cinema companies are outraged by the proposals, which would greatly reduce the standard gap of four months between cinematic openings and films becoming legally available for the small screen. They believe it would greatly cut into profits by reducing their time window for luring audiences into cinemas and have warned that it would cause many to close down.

Their cause is supported by 23 directors – including James Cameron, Kathryn Bigelow, Guillermo del Toro and Michael Mann – who attacked the plans in an open letter published in trade magazine Variety two weeks ago.

Last year, the UK's three largest cinema chains announced they would refuse to screen Alice in Wonderland due to Disney's plan to release the movie on DVD a month earlier than usual. Although Cineworld and Vue eventually relented, Odeon went through with the boycott.

The prospect of this occurring on a much wider scale is now looking increasingly likely, with cinemas in the US already cutting the number of promotional trailers they are showing for both studios.

Under the studios' scheme, which has first been lined up for launch in the US, customers would pay $30 to rent a single movie digitally. Although this is a relatively high price for an individual film, they believe it is cost-effective for large families. There is also speculation that Google will sign deals with Sony and Universal to stream films through its YouTube website in competition with iTunes and Amazon.

Director James Cameron commented: "The cinema experience is the wellspring of our entire business, regardless of what platforms we trickle down to. If the exhibitors are worried, I'm worried. We should be listening to them."
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 08 Aug 2011 02:01 #36824

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Fox Intl To Stop 35MM Print Distribution In Hong Kong & Macau: Digital Only After Jan. 1

By NIKKI FINKE | Sunday August 7, 2011 @ 7:46pm PDT
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Twentieth Century Fox International will cease the distribution of 35mm film prints to theaters in Hong Kong and Macau effective January 1st, 2012. After that date all Fox feature film content in cinemas will be provided exclusively through DCI-compliant digital media formats. Through December 31, 2011 Fox will provide its films in both 35mm print and DCI-compliant digital formats to the region.

“We anticipate that by the end of 2011, exhibitors in Hong Kong and Macau will have converted more than 95% of their cinema screens to DCI-compliant digital cinema projection technology,” Sunder Kimatrai, SVP and Asia-Pacific Regional Managing Director for Twentieth Century Fox International said in a statement issued Monday. “As a logical result of the transition to digital cinema, we feel the time is right to phase out the supply of our films in 35mm analogue formats. The entire Asia-Pacific region has been rapidly deploying digital cinema systems and over the next two years we expect to be announcing additional markets where supply of 35mm will be phased out.”

Julian Levin, Executive Vice President Digital Exhibition and Non-Theatrical Sales added, “Fox thanks Hong Kong and Macau exhibitors and key digital cinema integrators for their continued efforts and investments to convert cinema screens to digital projection technology. Fox has entered numerous digital cinema deployment agreements in Hong Kong/Macau and throughout the Asia-Pacific region, and we will continue to support DCI-compliant digital cinema conversion efforts in all major markets. The future of the cinema business is in digital technology, particularly as a basis for providing to consumers the extra value of 3D cinema. We encourage exhibitors in all countries to sign with their local integrator or to speak with Fox directly about their digital cinema conversion plans.”

Twentieth Century Fox International is a unit of Fox Filmed Entertainment, a segment of News Corporation.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 07 Oct 2011 14:34 #37173

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GALVA, Ill. — One hundred and sixty miles southwest of Chicago, a man has planted a pair of reconditioned 20-by-48-foot drive-in movie screens in what used to be a cornfield.



Michael Phillips

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I went out there the other night, to Galva Autovue Drive-in (admission: $3 for anyone older than 3), owned and operated by a full-time factory worker, mellow drive-in fanatic and Peoria native named Justin West. "Cool" doesn't begin to describe it. The Autovue was one of the great outdoor filmgoing experiences of my life. Beautiful late-summer weather. The Big Dipper tipping high above the screen showing "Captain America: The First Avenger." A concession stand in a steel building serving Sprecher's root beer, "cheesy tots" and excellent popcorn. A slow cooker filled with melted butter, inches from the cash register. It was enough to make a nostalgist weep buttery tears of joy.

But a question kept nagging at the experience: How much longer will something like this be around?

It's not just drive-ins I'm talking about. I mean movie theaters, outdoor or indoor, showing films on actual 35 mm film, on big platters, instead of being projected digitally. West finds himself faced with an expensive decision. Right now it costs about $75,000 per screen to convert to digital projection. That's $150,000 (lower if he waits a couple of years for used equipment) for a weather-dependent outdoor theater open four or five months out of the year, in a town of 2,589 at the last census.

So does he pony up or, in a year or two or three, call it a day?

"I don't know," West says.

This weekend, Friday and Saturday, West closes up shop for the season with "Spy Kids 4" and "I Don't Know How She Does It."

"This place," West says, "has paid for itself, though it hasn't really given me anything else. But I enjoy it." He loved drive-ins as a kid. When he left Peoria for college in the early 1980s and returned four years later, his favorite drive-ins were already gone. The Autovue keeps the dream and the tradition alive, he says.

But "this conversion to digital the film companies are forcing on the theaters — I know it's going to save them a lot of money …" West says, his voice trailing off. Bucking every entertainment trend on the planet, West opened the Autovue in 2005. "Ever since I opened I've had people come up to me in one of the projection booths and ask: 'Where are the DVD players?' They don't have a clue how this works!" He chuckles, ruefully. West thinks a lot about how the forced conversion from film to digital will zero out an untold number of small-town theaters, outdoor and indoor, along with various second-run houses in larger urban areas.

A figure commonly batted around: 75 percent of box-office revenue comes from 25 percent of the theaters. "So that means the other 75 percent can die off and the film companies won't be too worried about it," West says.

Change is coming

Average moviegoers don't know or care much about whether the film they're seeing is being projected digitally or on 35 mm film stock. Digital has been with us for several years now; the distinction is blurred. And the projection conditions vary widely from screen to screen, from multiplex to multiplex.

Still, "You don't have that graininess with digital," says Doug Knight, general manager of Knight's Action Park and Route 66 Twin Drive-In in Springfield, the state's only digital projection drive-in. (Illinois has 11 drive-ins still operating.) Knight claims his business is up around 15 to 20 percent since installing the digital projection system.

Higher up the food chain, you don't hear a peep about 35 mm, except in comparison to buggy-whip manufacturers in the early days of the automobile. Chris McGurk is in the catbird seat; as chief executive officer of Cinedigm Digital Cinema Corp., in Woodland Hills, Calif., he's making millions in the business of installing digital cinema equipment. Is there any incentive for the six major film studios, plus all the other film distributors, to continue striking film prints for exhibition?

"None whatsoever. None," he says. "The studios will save over a billion dollars a year in distribution costs. It took probably five, 10 years too long to even get to this point in digital conversion because this industry is very resistant to change … a lot of talent was suspicious of the new medium. Some people were, and are, wedded to film, the arguing being that it's 'richer,' it's this, it's that, it's the other thing. Which is not true."

Some numbers: Film distributors commonly spend $1,200-$1,300 to strike a single 35 mm print, plus shipping costs. Digital delivery of a new release, by contrast, is more like $100, according to Cinedigm's McGurk.

The studios have been steamrolling this one for several years while squabbling with exhibitors over the bill for the digital conversion tab. The industrywide conversion to digital has been financed by what's called a virtual print fee (VPF) formula. Digital projection equipment costs between $50,000 and $80,000 per screen on average. The majority of those costs will be repaid to the theater owners by the studios.

But it takes up to a decade. And the studios are saying that after September 2012 they won't be striking any new VPF deals. No deals, no subsidy.

Copyright © 2011, Chicago Tribune
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 07 Oct 2011 14:34 #37174

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Are small theaters punching a ticket to oblivion?
Price of technological tide may swamp some second-run, drive-in and small theaters as movie studios phase out film prints in favor of cost-effective digital distribution. It will cost them, either way.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 10 Jan 2012 15:43 #37730

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Almost one year since this thread started time is running out on converting .
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 07 Feb 2012 23:09 #37813

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slapintheface wrote:
Almost one year since this thread started time is running out on converting .

Slap...you have forever to do this.
Stuidios will have to give you 35mm film; revrobor knows all about theaters as he ran one for a long time.
He says they'll give me film if I want it.
He's going to sue them personally if they don't...even though he doesn't work in teh biz anymore.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 08 Feb 2012 02:26 #37814

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I have been asked to act as a consultant for a man who has bought a large single screen in a metro area. I am advising him to re-install 35mm equipment as it will primarily be a retro theatre with an eye 2 or 3 years down the road to purchase a digital machine if they are still viable. Retro films will be available for some time as they have been available longer than I am old. Those who need to consider digital now are those who want to be first run or sub run. Not all theatre operators need to panic. But according to the AMPAS stuff released digitally now may not live long enough to become classics. I am also advising this man to restore the theatre to it's original art-deco styling and to not cut it up into several theatres. Multiple screens is not the answer to doing good business as some think. The will be a return to a theatre the way it used to be with films from "back in the day", matinees with WWII films and the "Singing Cowboys, cartoons and if possible historic newsreels and midnight shows (yes, with THAT picture) with the staff dressed in costumes to fit the theme of the attractions. There will be such things as Tuesday night dish giveaways, Monday night "buck" night and half price for concessions with ten ticket stubs.
Bob Allen
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Last Edit: 08 Feb 2012 02:28 by revrobor. Reason: Typo
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 08 Feb 2012 03:33 #37815

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REVROBER-- I respect your opinion... but........If you are giving advice to keep a large single screen and there going to play retro films that are on dvd --oh my God...."If 2 or 3 years down the line buy digital machine if there still viable"..........huh----SINGING COWBOYS???????????

I hope they are not paying you!
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 08 Feb 2012 03:38 #37816

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Cinema’s Digital Takeover: The Decline And Fall Of Film As We Have Known It

By KINSEY LOWE | Saturday February 4, 2012 @ 2:16pm PST
Tags: 3D, Digital Cinema

COMMENTS 45
Digital cinema has overtaken film a lot sooner than many people might have predicted before Avatar was released, but it was probably inevitable. At latest count almost two-thirds of all domestic screens used digital projectors by the beginning of the year. That’s 25,570 screens out of a total 39,641 or 64.5%, according to the National Association of Theatre Owners. Roughly half — 12,620 — of those digital screens were equipped to show movies in 3D and 244 of those were IMAX installations. The total of individual theaters was almost 5,800, and 3,028 of those were partly or completely digital. And counting. Back in mid-2009 as James Cameron was preparing to unleash Avatar on the moviegoing public in December, only a few more than 1,600 screens in the US were equipped for digital 3D as of July out of a total of some 38,000 indoor screens at roughly 5,400 locations. By the time Avatar opened there were roughly 3,000 3D digital screens. In little more than two years, the number of 3D screens has quadrupled — propelled at least initially by Avatar’s success.

Globally, digital projection was predicted to overtake film early in 2012 — if it hasn’t already — and by the end of the year 63% of all cinema screens around the world will be digital, according to IHS Screen Digest Cinema Intelligence Service. By 2015 IHS predicts that 35mm theatrical film will amount to a niche format with just 17% of global movie screens. Art houses and independent theaters will struggle to cope with the cost of conversion. According to NATO, Canada has 1,848 digital screens, and the rest of the world has 38,874. That makes a global total of 66,292 digital screens. Texas Instruments, which licenses DLP technology used in most digital cinema projectors, in early December boasted installation of more than 51,000 DLP branded digital screens worldwide — nearly double the previous year. Slightly more aggressive than IHS Screen Digest, the company predicts a full global transition to digital by the end of 2015. Conversion to digital has accelerated in Europe, China, Russia, Latin America, India, Africa, Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

The conversion to digital also has put enormous pressure on the makers of cameras and film stock, which will likely become more expensive to produce. With print production significantly reduced, labs such as Technicolor and DeLuxe have transitioned into other areas such as digital post production, broadcast production and digital delivery. Technicolor has downsized significantly and I hear no longer handles 35mm film, only 70mm (most likely IMAX). Movies are still being shot and distributed on film but demand has decreased enough that 2011 saw the end of production of 35mm film movie cameras. Three major film camera manufacturers — ARRI, Panavision and Aaton — have phased out their film cameras to concentrate on exclusively on design and manufacture of digital cameras. To remain competitive they had to because filmmakers who wanted to shoot digital were already using cameras by RED — such as David Fincher for The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and Peter Jackson on The Hobbit movies. Sony is another option and there are others.

Some industry professionals at first embraced digital reluctantly for aesthetic reasons — not enough depth or contrast under certain lighting conditions and issues with image detail. Preservation of digital formats also remains tricky and possibly unreliable over the long term compared to polyester film masters. Another bone of contention is 3D, in which screen illumination can be reduced by 25% or more. But projectors capable of higher-resolution and brighter images are already making their way into theaters, replacing earlier models with next generation technology. Eventually, shooting and projection rates of 50 frames per second or more, compared to 24 or 30 fps, promise an amazingly crisp image that will enhance or maybe even surpass 3D in visual appeal. Digital makes this more economically feasible because digital storage space is cheaper than raw film stock and processing which would at least double the cost of shooting with film at higher shutter speeds.

As recently as 2009 ARRI was only building film cameras by special order. It’s probably only a matter of time before the movies conversion to digital is all but complete. In a post late last year on Creative Cow, a site for movie and TV production professionals, ARRI VP of cameras Bill Russell said “In two or three years, it could be 85% digital and 15% film.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 08 Feb 2012 21:56 #37818

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Hey Slap:
Simply because a film is also on DVD does not mean everyone buys or rents it. There is no "theatre experience" that goes with viewing a DVD at home.
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Feb 2012 13:08 #37821

  • slapintheface
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i AGREE 100 %
But the odds of turning that into a viable biz model is 1--in
a
million.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Feb 2012 15:53 #37823

  • revrobor
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I believe Slap ol' buddy. Just watch me.
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
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