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TOPIC: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND!

Re: Narrow Gauge is wrong about NATO and Fithian 05 Apr 2011 13:46 #35655

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Absolutely!! We forget so soon. Remember the latest attempts by our beloved State to tax movie tickets? Still waiting for your check on the defeat of that sales tax initiative. My lobby was covered with anti tax billboards, collected hundreds of signatures in my lobby to get it on the ballot, donated 1500 in cash to defeat the madated sales tax and placed dozens of signs at road crossings. And we won-results! Because we won-no sales tax means lower prices for my customers. Where were you?? Where was NATO? This is the point-results. For my money I want positive results and NATO doesn't get it done
Mike I know you talk to a lot of people, but not everyone. Just this morning another exhibitor(5 plus theaters) told me that he thought Fithian was nothing more than a tool for the studios. Read film-tech once in awhile and you get other insights into the effectiveness of NATO. I would be happy to join NATO when one of our own heads up the organization. Someone who has worked in theaters, knows how to lace a film and build up previews. Someone who has built a theater and knows first hand the difficulties of the ADA, codes etc. Someone who can actually lead. I am sorry but Fithian is not that person.

When John Fithian tells the people at Cinecom to convert to digital by 2013 or be out of business whithout mentioning that they may go out of business anyway because of vod and the collapsing window-well that is just wrong. New leadership is needed at NATO and I am not the only "crazy stalker dude" saying it.
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Re: Narrow Gauge is wrong about NATO and Fithian 05 Apr 2011 14:16 #35657

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"winning!" :cheer: Thanks for a more thoughtful response. I always detect, and not just from my friend in the log clogged towns interior from the sexy coast of Maine, a certain, almost childlike expectation from their parents: they just don't do enough. So: what should they be doing? What more should they do? What exactly do you think they should be doing?
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Last Edit: 05 Apr 2011 14:17 by Mike.
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Re: Narrow Gauge is wrong about NATO and Fithian 05 Apr 2011 17:14 #35660

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Mike wrote:
I'm talking about my buddy here,. The closest theatre owner to me with whom I talk regularly. That said..... He takes every opportunity to bash NATO and John Fithian and for the life of me I just do not get it. What do you want? What do you expect? What do you expect of them that you are not willing to do? What do you really know that NATO does? My sense is that you know very little but that doesn't stop you. Why don't you show some leadership and put your money or time where your mouth is. Try volunteering or lifting a finger. Don't take movies from the distribs with the VOD shorts? You know how you're talking with someone and you notice they're sort of a crazy stalker dude? It's happening. Lighten up. Put up or just stop it. Please. Mike "sexy coast."

Mike,

It's like trying to win an argument against "Obama Birthers," "Intelligent Design Theorists," or people who believe the moon landing was staged on a movie set. They've been brainwashed into a paranoid stupor, and there is no bringing them back to reality. It's a waste of time and energy to even bother, just let them stew in their own world of blaming everyone else but themselves with own their narrow mindedness, and hope that not too many other misguided souls sip from their brand of cool-aid. It's a sad form of natural selection, from a business perspective.

Rick
"As long as there are sunsets and stars at night, there will always be drive-in movies."
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 05 Apr 2011 19:46 #35662

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The near future indi operators will count more and more on what REGAL and AMC decide to do rather than NATO. As Regal & Amc have gone digital so must we. The VOD &DVD window changing will be based on what the chains are willing to take. If the big 2 chains boycott a film due to short windows the short windows will stop. Nato has very little influence in these areas. What Nato can do better is set up buying groups that put the manufactures and theater owners together in a buying group.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 06 Apr 2011 00:29 #35665

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Rick,

I would suggest that for every cool-aid drinking NATO hater there is a cool-aid drinking NATO lover.

Slap

We have always counted on the big guys to a great deal. Let us hope that their desires remain the same as ours! So far so good.

Mike,

I have and will help out where necessary but do not expect me to publicly lash out against the studios. I could in the video business because I had many avenues to buy product. In this industry, I have to kiss ass as I can't buy my films from Amazon or Wal-Mart. And some of those asses are pretty stinky!
Last Edit: 06 Apr 2011 00:30 by rufusjack.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 06 Apr 2011 13:11 #35670

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Hollyblog: Studios Are Determined to Kill the Film Business
By Anonymous
CINEMA-CON, LAS VEGAS:

Film studios seem determined to kill the movie business completely. After putting video stores out of business by authorizing Redbox to rent videos for $1 per day from what amounts to a Coke machine, now they want to put movie theaters in a coma by authorizing a new at-home video-on-demand release during what has until now been the exclusive first-run theater window.

This comes after demanding for the last 10 years that theaters spend $ billions on digital sound, stadium seating, digital projection, 3D projection and new locations.

Now James Cameron wants a completely new system put in place with enhanced frame rates for further $ billions.

In a stunning suspension of disbelief, many studio executives argue that an enhanced early at-home alternative will encourage MORE people to go to the movie theater -- do people this naive really exist? It sounds exactly like the last ten years of internet gurus and solons calmly insisting that free (stolen) music would encourage higher CD sales. See how well that worked out. Fool me once ... call me a record executive; fool me twice ... what do they think, we're politicians?

I ask: "Are you a movie without a movie theater?"

If you answer “yes” a movie is a movie even if released just on television, then go ahead. In fact, if that’s true why aren’t you doing it now? The TV networks have no exhibitor relationships to destroy, why aren’t they spending $300 million to produce Avatar, or $150 million to produce “the Hobbit” or even $60 million to produce “The Hangover?” I know why because I’ve asked TV network heads in the past. They say it’s ludicrous to assume they could spend like a movie studio for TV product.

The TV movie model does not support the economics of a major feature film. It is the theatrical release that makes a movie a movie and builds the momentum and interest that enables it to gross over a billion dollars. For a major worldwide hit, it is also the largest contributor to the profits of a movie. Don’t be fooled by “retail” numbers. Home video was a very big retail number but the share to the studios was around 35 vs. 60 percent for a major hit in the movie theater.

Further, a major theatrical hit has an unlimited upside while a major video hit is intrinsically limited. Video and television are great for catalog, but they do not fund a front line release schedule -- for that you need the movie theater with its higher per capita income and greater share to the studio.

As for the impact on theatrical attendance, I believe it will be devastating. However, among studio execs the best case quoted to me was a 10 percent drop in attendance with the executives insisting that, "Some theaters will close, others will raise prices ... it's all good."
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 06 Apr 2011 13:33 #35671

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I feel the need to clear up a point about Redbox. No studio has the ability to keep product from a rental store/machine in reality. Due to the First Sale Doctrine, anyone who has purchased a dvd can rent it out to anyone or sell it to anyone it wants.

At first Redbox bought dvds from normal video distributors. Then some studios (most notably Warner Bros., 20th Century Fox, and Universal refused to allow distributors to sell to them. So Redbox started to buy those studios' movies from any mass merchant it could (Wal-Mart, Sam's Club, etc.) They did this for 9-12 mos. It got to the point where Wal-Mart instituted a 5 copy per person limit at the urging of the studios.

After a while it became evident that this was a pain in the ass for Redbox to handle, that and a reduction in costs per unit led Redbox to sign deals to get product from the 3 studios and Sony (on movies that gross more than $50) after 28 days of release. Netflix also signed these deals.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 06 Apr 2011 17:31 #35677

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Well our local chapter of NATO has and continues to fight sales tax and minimum wage increases at the state level. NATO has a political response website that I can email my representatives at the state and local level about issues NATO and myself are concerned about with just a couple of clicks of the button. All the address are there and are sent automatically. So they do help fight things like sales taxes and labeling laws which will cause us all to spend $$$. That is their job and they do that. They have flooded my email with letters they have written to the studios since last Thursday’s announcement. It is not their job to tell us how to run our business by telling us not to take prints etc. Nato members certainly do practice their right and refuse prints from studios who they don’t want to work with etc.

On a topic more related to the title of this poet I believe the independent movies will be easier to get in digital format. So even to get a good stream of independent films you will need to be able to play them digitally. Probably from a Blueray and not need a DCI hard drive.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 07 Apr 2011 14:59 #35681

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Gene,

Will you give some coverage ratios that you see the banks look for?

EBIT/PAYMENT OR whatever ratio you look at?

Thanks
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Apr 2011 00:48 #35686

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More Theaters Threatening Movie Moguls

By THE DEADLINE TEAM | Friday April 8, 2011 @ 2:45pm PDT
Tags: AMC, Cinemark Entertainment, DirecTV, Fox, Premium VOD, Sony, Universal, Warner Bros
COMMENTS (12)EMAIL THIS | PRINT THIS |
Nikki Finke (who's just fnishing up her medical leave with a last visit to the doctor) will be posting a complete update on the battle over DirecTV's recently announced premium plan in partnership with Sony, Warner Bros, Fox and Universal to offer on-demand movies only 60 days after they premiere in theaters. On Wednesday, she revealed that Regal Cinemas warned studio marketers that it will drastically reduce the amount of play time for each of the quartet's movie trailers in every Regal movie house (just in time for the summer tentpole season, too). The Cinemark chain is following suit with boycotting trailers and signage from the participating studios. Now comes this statement from AMC Entertainment:

We at AMC feel movie theatres are a critically important business to many parties: the 200+ million guests we host year after year who choose to view films on the large screen; the communities of which our theatres are an integral part; the artists who create the movies we show; and ultimately the entertainment industry for which our theatres generate the highest quality source of revenue.

We believe the theatrical experience has a bright future, and we are aggressively investing to prepare for it. We are in the midst of a multi-year, multi-million dollar rollout of digital projection and 3D, IMAX and our own proprietary ETX format. We are also introducing a new guest rewards program, better-for-you items, enhanced food and beverage offerings, dine-in theatre options and alternative, engaging programming for our guests to enjoy in our comfortable, state-of-the-art auditoriums. All activities we are currently engaged in have common goals - to increase attendance at our theatres and maintain the health of our industry.

The p-VoD world as currently defined threatens that health. As such, we have notified studios of our expectations regarding economic arrangements on movies that go p-VoD. It is not wise to discuss details in the press, and Company policy precludes it, but as these windows shrink and threaten our industry's future, it is only logical to expect AMC to adapt its economic model.

The future is bright, even as it promises to be different, and we look forward to the success that lies ahead for all parties.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Apr 2011 00:50 #35687

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THE ABOVE POST IS WHAT I WAS HOPING FOR --- NOW LETS SEE WHO BLINKS.......
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Apr 2011 13:24 #35691

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Rufusjack,

While your question may appear to be helpful, it is only a small part of having a loan approved at a bank. There are many other factors that must be considered for example Venue Rating. If a theater does not meet certain standards in their presentation to customers and structure inclucing dimensions of theaters, whether they are an A, B, C or D rated venue.
History of revenue stream, projected pro forma, etc, the one number you seek could be misleading to a casual reader.

Consequently I would not publich the numbers I know banks look at as it might be confusing to someone who does not understand all the elements in bank underwriting.

If that number alone is important to you, I am sure with a couple of phone calls you could get it.

For the reason stated above so as not to confuse the passerby on this website, I will not respond with a number out of respect for the entire process.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 09 Apr 2011 17:06 #35695

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Gene,

All of the reasons you stated are reasons we should have this conversation.

I am always amazed how many people choose to get into this business without much experience and doing their homework. At least over the past 10 years it has not been terribly expensive to get into the business. It is one of the hardest to operate though.

Now we are seeing a huge hurdle to operate a theater going forward. You mentioned earlier about blockbuster movies going from 4300 to 4700 locations. At least in my area 4300 includes any theater that can turn their lights on. Of those, I will be shocked if many of those can make the transition as they only gross $30,000 or so a screen right now.

The terms/formulas/etc. are not difficult to understand in my opinion. They should be understood by all who are in this business or any business. Unfortunately many are not and maybe they deserve to get out of this business.

If anything, these types of forums should be a way to educate others like I did for Technicolor 3d. If you add some examples (which you have done in some case so far), I think the bigscreenbiz commmunity would be thankful for that.

Many of us have wondered what doing certain things to improve our businesses could mean to our bottom line. Which is I why I was questioning your 20% digital conversion improvement number earlier.

NATO/CBG can benefit from this type of discussion as well.
Last Edit: 09 Apr 2011 17:15 by rufusjack.
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 10 Apr 2011 11:51 #35699

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www.beaumontenterprise.com/default/artic...hallenge-1328846.php

JACKSON, Minn. (AP) — A couple with a long history in the theater enjoy the ups and downs of owning a historic theater in southwest Minnesota, despite its many challenges.
"We'd been looking a really long time for a theater of our own . and finally found one that we decided to try," said Nikki Schwartz, who owns the Historic State Theatre in Jackson with her husband, Mike Schwartz.
They purchased the old theater Dec. 9, 2002, and offered the first movie showing three weeks later. Since then, they've been running the only movie theater in Jackson County, with its vintage silver screen-film setup and beautiful art nouveau décor.
Nikki started working in movie theaters in 1987 in Denver, when she was in high school. Mike grew up working at a drive-in theater in Lusk, Wyo., where he started around 1978 — as a fifth-grader.
The Schwartzes both have jobs outside the State Theatre. Nikki is a cook at Jackson Middle School, and Mike books films for movie theaters in North Dakota, Minnesota, Idaho, Missouri, Montana and New Jersey.
Keeping any historic building up is difficult, but upkeep for the State hasn't been that tough, compared to a new problem theater operators have not faced in the past.
"Our biggest challenge right now is the digital cinema," Mike said.
The transition to digital from the existing film setup will cost approximately $70,000.
"It's going to be a hard transition for a lot of theaters," Nikki said. "And a lot of theaters will close because of it."
A digital system would be computer-operated, so the Schwartzes would need to purchase not only a computer, but also a cooling system to keep the computer from overheating. The sound system would need to be upgraded. The screen would need to be replaced, the old projector removed, and film — like the musicians who once played tunes during silent pictures — would become a thing of the past.
"For us to fit in with the program we're in, we have to be converted by September of 2012 . or actively (making) progress" Nikki said. "Eventually, 35-millimeter film will no longer exist, so we have been diligent in . planning for the future."
The price tag for digital conversion is steep, but the State is by no means alone in facing the upgrading challenge. Every theater is facing the same difficulty.
The Schwartzes hope the greater Jackson community will rally around them and the State Theatre because it values the opportunities the movie theater presents for residents of all ages, from small children to seniors.
"We need help," Nikki said. "We're taking donations for it from the community. . We'll probably try and do some fundraising. We just put a roof on last year, and there's just no way . it's not possible for us to do it, it's not. We're barely keeping it open, and it's because we're passionate about it."
Community organizations have already begun to pitch in to help defray the costs of the upgrade. The Jackson Preservation Alliance donated $100 and 25 calendars, which sell for $12 each. The local beautification committee gave $1,400.
"The towns that have single screen theaters — and there are some that do rather well — it's because their community really values the fact that they do have that as an option for their children," Nikki said. "You hear people talk about how there's nothing to do for their kids, so it would be really sad to lose something that they do have for their kids."
Main Street theaters can be an important asset in keeping downtowns thriving, Nikki said.
And the Jackson community does value its theater, Mike said, although sometimes that feeling isn't reflected well in attendance figures.
"Statistics show that 12 percent go to movies on a regular basis. If that 12 percent would come here, we would be OK. We wouldn't have any problems," Nikki said. "The hardest thing is when somebody comes up to you and says that they went and saw the movie that you're playing out of town. And that happens. And that hurts."

The Schwartzes see hopeful signs in the small community of Sherburn, where the theater raised $30,000 in a little more than a month for the digital upgrades it needed.
"They just really came together," Mike said.
The Schwartzes have to be careful when they choose what movies to present to Jackson. Which films do well and which films tank isn't always predictable, and the quality of a movie doesn't seem to have much to do with it.
Horror movies, for example, don't do well at the State Theatre.
"If they don't work, we can't bring them in. We've lost money on a lot of movies," Nikki said. "The film rental has gone up a bunch, and minimum for a movie is $250 . plus you're looking at $100 for shipping of the print. So it happens — we've lost money on movies, and we try really hard not to."
Movies that do well are movies that appeal to a wide audience, from children to families to seniors. Movies that don't do well, ironically, are movies that are aimed at the demographic the movie industry targets the most often: young males.
"Those are the ones who leave town, mostly. If we can play it on the release date, that helps, but we can't always play them on the release date," Nikki said, explaining how the film companies require big advances or guarantees for movies to play on their release dates. "So that's a risk. We try not to do that very often. We have to be pretty confident that we're not going to lose money on it."
The "Twilight" series has done well at the State so far, partly because the Schwartzes have been careful to play them on their release dates. Had they waited, the movie's target audience would have gone elsewhere to see it rather than waiting for the hometown theater to catch up.
"It really just depends on the crowd. It's not even so much the genre. We've had some that have done well here that haven't necessarily done well nationally," Nikki said. "'Seabiscuit' did OK nationally, but it did really well here, because it hit everybody from kids to seniors, and they really enjoyed it."
Predicting which films will lose money isn't easy. "Happy Feet," which received positive reviews from critics and audiences, lost money at the State Theatre. "Kangaroo Jack," universally panned by critics and loathed by the majority of people who actually went to see it, did really well. "Daddy Day Care," which critics hated even more, also made money for the State.
"Yogi Bear" played better than "Tangled," probably because people went out of town in order to see "Tangled," but wouldn't bother going out of town to see "Yogi Bear."
"If we can't play it fast on the release date for the movies that are super big, we may as well not even bother, because they've already gone out of town to see it," Nikki said. "But we still play them for the ones that are loyal, even though sometimes maybe we shouldn't."
Crowds at the State vary from two to 100 people, but the average draw is about 20 people. When the State hosts a midnight showing, however, sometimes 300 people show up.
"We brought midnight showings to the region," Nikki said.
The changes and the costs do have a silver lining, however, especially for movie fans.
"It's a much higher quality than anyone could get at home. It's commercial-grade, and they have very high standards for it," Nikki explained. "They . didn't really start rolling out (changes) until they were confident that the images produced by the new digital equipment surpassed the images of the 35-mm film."
The improvements may also afford other opportunities for the State, which may be able to offer live opera or concert feeds to small communities, where chances to see those types of performances are rare.
"That's why I think it will benefit smaller communities more so than, say, big cities," Nikki said. "Big cities aren't going to care about playing concerts when people can go to the concert, but somebody might not want to drive three hours to go to a concert and pay $100 a ticket."
The best part of running a movie theater for Nikki is watching the movies and talking to customers about them, whereas Mike just enjoys the movie industry in general.
"Jackson's a really nice community," Nikki said. "It really does have a lot going for it."
The Schwartzes also hope to continue preserving the history of the State Theatre, and though the costs are challenging, they also hope to continue making improvements. They would like to redo the marquee and replace the seats in the theater.
Constructed in 1926 by Frank Matuska, the theater cost $50,000 to build, according to "Celebrating 150: Jackson, Minnesota," and it still features its original silver screen and many of its original, opulent Art Deco details.
"We really do love it, and it's really a part of who we are," Nikki said. "And we really, really hope that we can keep it going and get it through the process that will keep it going for generations to come."

Read more: www.beaumontenterprise.com/default/artic...46.php#ixzz1J7lI0BTs

Read more: www.beaumontenterprise.com/default/artic...46.php#ixzz1J7l9Muv7
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Re: REPENT THE END IS AT HAND! 11 Apr 2011 14:55 #35715

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rufusjack..
that is what Destination Heartland was built to do..
however,there is a process...and it cannot be done piecemeal..
if people want our help...there is a system and process to do so.
if they do not want to go thru the process...cannot be done piecemeal.
www.destinationheartland.com


we are too busy helping people who are entering the process..
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