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TOPIC: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace

Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 07 Sep 2011 17:00 #36916

  • JPRM
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It seems to me that folks who are writing off 3D are looking only at one set of numbers (percent of gross in 3D vs. 2D) without really considering other factors. Oversaturation, (low) quality of many 3D films and negative reaction to 3D ticket prices all play a role in this.

There's really no way yet to predict whether 3D will last, but citing flops like "Conan" and "Shark Night" does little to support the notion that it won't. What we DO know is that there's a LOT of money and a lot of movie biz clout behind 3D. If studios stop flooding the marketplace with bad 3D films, I think it could be around for awhile.
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 16 Sep 2011 13:35 #36985

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www.slate.com/id/2303814/?_r=true New article titled "Who killed 3d".
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 16 Sep 2011 15:57 #36986

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JPRM wrote:
It seems to me that folks who are writing off 3D are looking only at one set of numbers (percent of gross in 3D vs. 2D) without really considering other factors. Oversaturation, (low) quality of many 3D films and negative reaction to 3D ticket prices all play a role in this.

There's really no way yet to predict whether 3D will last, but citing flops like "Conan" and "Shark Night" does little to support the notion that it won't. What we DO know is that there's a LOT of money and a lot of movie biz clout behind 3D. If studios stop flooding the marketplace with bad 3D films, I think it could be around for awhile.

It will probably be around as long as it was the last two times Hollywood threw it at us.
Bob Allen
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 19 Sep 2011 02:43 #36997

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revrobor - Do you think of the first two eras of 3D as the 50s and the 80s? I never thought 3D's comebacks (after its 'golden age' in the 50s) gathered much steam...or had all that much money behind them.

I don't know if 3D will hang around longer this time or not, but I do think the conditions are a little different. Studios have to be smart about how they utilize 3D, but I'm surprised at how fast people are to write it off.

Here's a link to a site I like on various myths about the first big wave of 3D:

www.3dfilmpf.org/info-top-10-3D-myths.html
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 19 Sep 2011 04:02 #36998

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IMHO the 3D films of the fifties died because of the poor quality of the stories. While there were several good films made during that time most were excuses to throw things at the camera. For most of that time the glasses WERE cardboard. The projectors were mechanically interlocked and the image was projected through a polarized filter. There was no BO upcharge however. I barely remember the second incarnation so that tells you how long it lasted. I think in addition to the generally poor stories the glasses added to it's demise.
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 19 Sep 2011 05:28 #36999

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Hi again, revrobor - I've always liked 3D and enjoy talking and thinking about it, so I hope you won't take any questions I bring up as a sign of disrespect.

I think the folks on the 3D Preservation site have some very good points regarding the quality of the films, what killed 3D before, etc. Also, the number of 3D films produced during the Golden Age of 1952 to 1955 is surprisingly low - an even 50 movies.

In looking over the list of titles of the era and reading up on projection and available technology, it looks like the format itself was too cumbersome. Just dealing with keeping two prints in sync during projection must have been a nightmare. (If you damaged one print, for instance, wouldn't you have to take out exactly the same frames from the other to preserve the sync?)

Of course, I've only read about this stuff, and you lived it. But I wonder if people nowadays know much about the history of presenting a film in 3D. After all, the version of 3D that most people remember involved standard projection and red & blue glasses in re-released films, which had nothing to do with 3D films as they were originally shown.
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 19 Sep 2011 13:24 #37002

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Michael Hurley
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Re: 3d ---12/31/2011--- rest in peace 11 Oct 2011 17:30 #37184

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The Wrap
Martin Scorsese's 'Hugo' Forces Cinephiles to Love 3D
Published: October 10, 2011 @ 10:34 pm

By Steve Pond

Martin Scorsese's "Hugo" was unveiled at the New York Film Festival on Monday night, and the reaction to his unfinished film was so enthusiastic that it left one question lingering in the air:

Has Scorsese just saved 3D?

No doubt that's overstating the case, but viewers seemed to agree that the film makes remarkable use of the oft-derided technology as it tells the story of a young boy who lives in a 1930s Paris train station, and whose life intersects with that of the pioneering French director Georges Melies.

"Hugo" is based on Brian Selznick's book "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" – and according to viewers, it is less of a children's film than Scorsese's cinematic history lesson, and his valentine to the early days of cinema.

It is also, said Katey Rich at CinemaBlend, "probably the most gorgeous live-action 3D film ever made."

The film screened as a mystery booking at NYFF, which announced last week that it would be showing a new work-in-progress by a master director. By the weekend, all interested parties had essentially figured out that the movie would be "Hugo."

Before the screening, Scorsese told the audience that his film still needed color correction, some visual effects and additional work on music and sound.

And as soon as the film ended, viewers rushed to the web to offer instant impressions. Since it's too early to actually review an unfinished film, Twitter became the medium of choice for quick reactions:

"Scorsese's not-quite-finished #HUGO has issues, but the right word is magical. Gorgeous use of 3D & his best film in many years (seriously)." (@andohehir)

"Charm, childhood, magic, movies, dreams, beauty: delightful." (@readgeoff)

"Scorsese uses 3D like the master he is. Definitely shows how it's done." (@BrianJSell)

"Not a kid's movie, but a movie to help kids fall in live with cinema. Spectacular 3D" (@misterpatches)

"Hugo is outstanding. 1st film where 3D is a vital organ of the overall narrative. Brilliant and at its heart, profound." (@davidc78)

"Scorsese delivers cinephile's wet dream ... Lead kid + first half are stiff, but it shifts into gear by finale." (@akstanwyck)

"Those folks who claim Scorsese doesn't do personal films anymore should prepare for their brains to melt." (@BilgeEbiri)

"Hugo is gorgeous, heartfelt, carefully constructed, totally Scorsese." (@42inchtv)

"Scorsese's Hugo is splendid in 3D and certainly a film for all ages. Movie buffs will love it. It's also the perfect companion to The Artist." (@blackfilm)

"In Hugo, Scorsese experiments w/ 3D the way Melies pioneered SFX. The simple first 1/3rd is a showcase for the power of visual storytelling." (@TheFilmStage)

And a partial naysayer: "I liked quite a bit of 'Hugo' but ultimately it never comes together in a cohesive or satisfying way." (@joblocom)


www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/marti...philes-love-3d-31718
"What a crazy business"
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