Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Lobby this sums up my worries.....
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: this sums up my worries.....

Re: this sums up my worries..... 27 May 2005 10:29 #10542

  • sevstar
  • sevstar's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 520
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: -1
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/27/business/media/27movie.html?ei=5090&en=e1bdc89f93fcee1a&ex=1274846400&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=print

May 27, 2005
With Popcorn, DVD's and TiVo, Moviegoers Are Staying Home
By LAURA M. HOLSON
LOS ANGELES, May 26 - Matthew Khalil goes to the movies about once a month, down from five or six times just a few years ago. Mr. Khalil, a senior at the University of California, Los Angeles, prefers instead to watch old movies and canceled television shows on DVD.

He also spends about 10 hours a week with friends playing the video game Halo 2. And he has to study, which means hours on the Internet and reading at least a book a week.

"If I want to watch a movie I can just rent it on DVD," he said. "I want to do things that conform to my time frame, not someone else's."

Like Mr. Khalil, many Americans are changing how they watch movies - especially young people, the most avid moviegoers. For 13 weekends in a row, box-office receipts have been down compared with a year ago, despite the blockbuster opening of the final "Star Wars" movie. And movie executives are unsure whether the trend will end over the important Memorial Day weekend that officially begins the summer season.

Meanwhile, sales of DVD's and other types of new media continue to surge.

With box-office attendance sliding, so far, for the third consecutive year, many in the industry are starting to ask whether the slump is just part of a cyclical swing driven mostly by a crop of weak movies or whether it reflects a much bigger change in the way Americans look to be entertained - a change that will pose serious new challenges to Hollywood.

Studios have made more on DVD sales and licensing products than on theatrical releases for some time. Now, technologies like TiVo and video-on-demand are keeping even more people at home, as are advanced home entertainment centers, with their high-definition television images on large flat screens and multichannel sound systems.

"It is much more chilling if there is a cultural shift in people staying away from movies," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of the Exhibitor Relations Company, a box-office tracking firm. "Quality is a fixable problem."

But even if the quality of movies can be improved, Mr. Dergarabedian said, the fundamental problem is that "today's audience is a much tougher crowd to excite. They have so many entertainment options and they have gotten used to getting everything on demand."

Last year Americans spent an average of 78 hours watching videos and DVD's, a 53 percent increase since 2000, according to a study by the Motion Picture Association of America, the film industry's trade group. DVD sales and rentals soared 676.5 percent during the same period, and 60 percent of all homes with a television set now also have a DVD player. DVD sales and rentals alone were about $21 billion, according to the Digital Entertainment Group.

Discs are now released just four months after a film's debut, and the barrage of advertising that accompanies the opening in movie theaters serves ultimately as a marketing campaign for the DVD, where the studios tend to make most of their profits.

By contrast, movie attendance has increased 8.1 percent from 2000 to 2004, according to the association. Many in the movie industry point to that figure as a sign of overall health. But attendance was down in three of those five years, and the sharp increase in attendance in 2002 is attributed to the overwhelming success of "Spider-Man" and "Star Wars: Attack of the Clones."

More recently, the number of moviegoers has dropped, sliding 4 percent in 2003, 2 percent in 2004 and 8 percent so far in 2005.

Time spent on the Internet has soared 76.6 percent and video game playing has increased 20.3 percent, according to the association. Last year, consumers bought $6.2 billion worth of video game software, an increase of 8 percent from 2003, according to the NPD Group, which tracks video game sales.

This does not mean that the $9.5 billion theatrical movie business is anywhere near its last gasp. It still plays a crucial role for the studios in generating excitement. But movie makers recognize they have to be more on their toes if they want to recapture their core audience.

"There are a lot of distractions," said Jerry Bruckheimer, who produced the "Pirates of the Caribbean" in 2003 as well as the successful "CSI" television franchise. "You need to pull them away from their computers. You need to pull them away from their video games."

Consider Matt Cohler, a 28-year-old vice president at Thefacebook.com, a Silicon Valley company that creates Internet student directories on college campuses. Mr. Cohler likes movies, but lately, he said, little has grabbed his attention.

He liked the new "Star Wars" and a documentary about the collapse of Enron. But of the Nicole Kidman-Sean Penn big-budget thriller, "The Interpreter," Mr. Cohler said, "It was only O.K." He has few plans to see anything else this summer, and said he was content to spend his free time online or writing e-mail.

"I feel quite strongly that, with a few exceptions, the quality of movies has been declining the last few years," he said.

Amy Pascal, the chairwoman of Sony Pictures Entertainment's motion picture group, said, "We can give ourselves every excuse for people not showing up - change in population, the demographic, sequels, this and that - but people just want good movies."

She predicted that "Bewitched," a romantic comedy about a producer who unwittingly hires a "real" witch for the lead role in a remake of the television show, would have a broad appeal. "If it was a straight-ahead remake of the show," she said, "we would have been guilty of doing the ordinary."

Jill Nightingale, 37, who works at IGN Entertainment in ad sales, is the type of moviegoer - older, female and important to studios - that "Bewitched" should appeal to. But video games increasingly have taken up time she otherwise might spend watching television or going to the movies. The last two theater showings she said she attended were "Star Wars" and "Sideways," which she viewed in December.

She plays a video game for 30 minutes each night before bed. Two weeks ago, five friends joined her at her San Francisco condo to drink wine and play "Karaoke Revolutions" on her Sony PlayStation, where the would-be American Idols had a competition, belting out everything from Top 40 hits to show tunes.

"Party games are great for dates," she said. "A few years ago I would have been at a bar or at a movie."

But what could well have the greatest impact on theater attendance is the growing interest in digital home entertainment centers, which deliver something much closer to a movie-style experience than conventional television sets.

Brian Goble, 37, a video game entrepreneur, said he had not been to a movie theater in two years, except to see "Star Wars" with his wife and four friends. Instead, he stays at his home in a Seattle suburb, where he has turned the basement into a home theater with a 53-inch high-definition television screen and large surround-sound speakers. He no longer has to deal with parking and jostling crowds, he said, a relief now that he has two children.

" It's really just not as comfortable and fun as being at home," he said. "You can pause, go to the bathroom, deal with a crying kid."

Mr. Goble rarely watches video-on-demand ("The quality is poor," he said.) Instead he has an account with Netflix and orders his movies online. When the Nicholas Cage movie "National Treasure" was released last November, for instance, he added it to his Netflix list so he would be sent a copy when it came out on DVD.

His prime regret about seeing the final installment of "Star Wars" was that he could not watch it at home. "The only reason to go to the theater these days," he said, "is because it is a movie you must see now."


The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 27 May 2005 12:01 #10543

  • AdFilms
  • AdFilms's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
"I feel quite strongly that, with a few exceptions, the quality of movies has been declining the last few years,"

Ain't that the truth.

If you make good movies, people will come.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 02 Jun 2005 19:25 #10544

  • reelman
  • reelman's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 200
  • Karma: 0
Having been around the business for over 20 years and remembering when there was barely a secondary market for films after theatrical, I am wondering just how short of a window the studios will finally settle on. As this article makes clear, less than 75 days is now reality. I wonder at what point it simply makes no more sense for anyone to go to the movies?

Here's the link at: http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=filmNews&storyID=2005-06-02T044957Z_01_N02137853_RTRIDST_0_FILM-VIDEOS-DC.XML

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Driven in part by concerns about a potentially slow DVD summer, the studios are ratcheting up release schedules for August and September, in some cases pushing out titles significantly earlier than under normal patterns.

"Guess Who," for example, recently was slotted for an Aug. 2 release by Sony Pictures. That's just 130 days after the film, which earned $67.1 million at the box office, opened in theaters. It's also two weeks shorter than Sony's average 144-day theatrical-to-video window.

Similarly, Paramount has scheduled "Sahara," which earned $61.7 million in theaters, for an Aug. 30 release, 144 days after its big-screen bow. Paramount's average window during the past eight years for films with theatrical earnings of at least $25 million is about 167 days.

"The fact of the matter is, the closer a video release is to a film's theatrical opening, the higher the awareness and, generally, the better the sales," said Thomas Lesinski, worldwide president of home entertainment at Paramount Pictures.

Indeed, during the past few years, theatrical-to-video windows have steadily shortened. So far this year, the average window for titles with box office earnings of at least $25 million is about 139 days, according to the DVD Release Report. That's down from 146 days last year, 153 days in 2003 and 171 days in 2002.

Several underperforming titles this year are coming to DVD at breakneck speed. Warner's "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous" and Sony's "XXX: State of the Union" are coming to DVD in the summer, less than 88 days after their theatrical debuts. And 20th Century Fox's "Flight of the Phoenix" hit DVD in March, a scant 74 days after its December opening in theaters.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 03 Jun 2005 18:07 #10545

  • jacker5
  • jacker5's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 873
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: 7
Just another thorn in the sides of the little guys. I was visitng a theatre her ein NY that has 4 digital screens. There are no projectionist preseJust another thorn in the sides of the little guys. I was visiting a theater her in NY that has 4 digital screens. There are no projectionist present and everything's controlled from a station in CA. No one touches anything and if there are any problems it gets taken care there and not in the theater.
I also saw plans of another screen being added. A digital screen. The blue prints show the booth as being a tiny space just enough room for the equipment and nothing else. There are no room for a projectionist or any human in there.
There is also talks starting as early as next year to almost eliminate union projectionist. As of now there work is cut to less than half and the other half being taken over by the little snot nose making corn.
And in the near future theaters will only be open weekends because of the lackluster receipts during the week. Even the box office receipts pretty much only count for the weekend when being tallied.
It is sad but true there is a new look for the cinema and only the top 10 chains will be there to survive.
First run movie are going to be released the same time as pay per view. And as much as you say no can't be..yes it can be!
I am scared to cause I really wanted to get in business but find my own side job as a projectionist is threatened!nt and everythingis controled from a sation in CA. No one touches anything and if there are any problems it gets taken care there and not in the theatre.
I also saw plans of another screen being added. A digital screen. The blue prints show the booth as being a tiny space just enough room for the equipment and nothing else. There are no room for a projectionist or any human in there.
There is also talks starting as early as next year to almost elimante union projectionist. As of now there work is cut to less than half and the other half being taken over by the little snot nose making corn.
And in the near future theatres wil only be opne weekends becasue of the lackluster recipts during the week. Even the box office recipts pretty much only count for the weeknd when being tallied.
It is sad but true there is a new look for the cinema and only the top 10 chains wil be there to survive.
First run movie are going to be released the saem time as pay per view. And as much as you say no can't be..yes it can be!
I am scared to casue I really wanted to get in business but find my own side job as a projectionist is threatened!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 03 Jun 2005 19:37 #10546

  • slapintheface
  • slapintheface's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 2389
  • Thank you received: 9
  • Karma: 16
The end of union projectionists may be one of the best things to happen in the theater bsns for some time. This should be looked upon as a pos not a negative as this will bring down cost for all big and small.No union no health ins. no 401k. THey have sucked the life out of theaters for years with way over priced pay checks..
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 03 Jun 2005 20:19 #10547

  • jacker5
  • jacker5's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 873
  • Thank you received: 6
  • Karma: 7
If you were getting paid $25.00 an hour with full benefits for pushing buttons you wouldn't say that!
Andlet me tell you you can tell the difference between a theatre that has union projectionist and no union. The presentation is 100% with union.
Sloppy build ups and presntation and god forbid a problem arises, the non uniopn theatres are a total mess!
Unions jobs protect and pay you top dollar for your work and top performace is given. I am also A transit driver and get paid $25.oo an hour as non union get paid $8.00. We have less accidents then the non union workers who are a dime a dozen.
The end of unions means the end of fair wages and job protection! But that is another topic!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 03 Jun 2005 22:40 #10548

  • Mike Spaeth
  • Mike Spaeth's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 481
  • Karma: 0
In no way does having a union projectionist in your booth guarantee a 100% presentation.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 04 Jun 2005 06:24 #10549

  • slapintheface
  • slapintheface's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 2389
  • Thank you received: 9
  • Karma: 16
That is so true ,The unions keep people into there late 80s and you have to take them when they show up ..Bad projectionist keep going from theater to theater ,they move them around.GONE also will be the double time for holidays $50 to $100 an hour . $MAKE UP AND BREAK DOWN CHARGES .. AFTER MIDNIGHT OT AND SO MUCH MORE.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 04 Jun 2005 11:37 #10550

  • rodeojack
  • rodeojack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1242
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 0
Geez, guys... someone needs to close the bar!

These days, being union... or not... isn't much more than a state of mind. I was a union projectionist for years... but that was back when the job was still considered a professional career. With all due respect to Jacker5's ambitions, those days are gone. It was the same for a lot of career broadcast engineers (I was one of them, too). Advances in solid state electronics turned out more reliable and stable equipment, which required much less babysitting. That, plus ownership consolidation and the end of FCC control over engineering qualifications signalled the end of the days when the Chief Engineer was the second most powerful person at a broadcast facility.

Theatres are no different. With xenon lamps, platter or large reel transport systems, solid state sound systems and modern automation systems, there just is no reason to sit and watch a projector run anymore. That leaves the ability to get a show on the screen in question... and I'm sorry... being union may mean that MOST will take a professional approach to the task, but it doesn't mean that non union people can't do just as well.

Whether a staff member performs well in the booth or is relegated to being labeled a "snot nose" is a reflection on management. If they don't have a trained employee in the booth, it was by their choice. Ownership will frequently get the job done for the lowest possible cost. That's not unusual in any business. In the more extreme cases, it might be obvious to the customer and have an eventual effect on the bottom line, but not always.

Union or not, qualified or not, "snot nose" or not, digital or not, I would not agree that the majority of theatres are turning out lousy presentations. As is the case with any subject, the negative side gets the press. How often do you see a thread in these discussion boards where people gush over the high quality presentations at this theatre or that? Not all that often. On the other hand, the grumbling about getting "less than expected" is as common as negative headlines on your TV news shows. It's like it was, being a projectionist. If you did your job, nobody knew you were there. On the other hand, if anything went wrong in the booth, it was automatically your fault.

This business just ain't that bad. I'm an independent operator, and I make a decent living at it. Other than a couple of forays into "small chain" ownership, I've been sitting on this one property for 20 years. I've raised 4 kids and am putting 3 of them through college. My wife has been able to choose to stay at home with the kids. I, or my daughter build our films, maintain our projectors and run our shows. Neither of us are union. I have crystal clear pictures, digital sound, equipment that's upgraded as much as I can afford. My shows are reliable because I'm well aware that my customers come to see the show first... and buy my popcorn and pizzas second... well... they like my swingsets, too!


Oh... my place is a 3-screen drive-in... one show per day, closed 5 months out of the year, open full-time for 3 months & weekends for the other 4.

This business today is not BAD... it's DIFFERENT. Things change, and most businesses (and many job descriptions) have to adjust to survive. Historically, the theatre business is one of the best examples of this. Unfortunately, adjustment means that some theatres close, but others open, and not always by the conglomerates.

I consider myself extremely fortunate to have experienced not only the days of carbon arcs and changeovers, but also monster transmitters, tubes that needed fork lifts to change and voltages that would straighten the curls in your hair... but that doesn't mean that I wasn't excited about new technologies... WHEN IT BECAME APPROPRIATE TO DO SO (which has a lot to do with my attitude about digital cinema). In my humble opinion, the best at this business are those who take a wide view of the industry, see the game as it is from day to day, learn how to play it and find ways to enjoy doing it.

Whew... OK, I feel better. Now, I'm off to mop the snack bar floor! Anyone wanna help?


[This message has been edited by rodeojack (edited June 04, 2005).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 04 Jun 2005 13:20 #10551

  • BurneyFalls
  • BurneyFalls's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1341
  • Karma: 0
Very well put, rodeojack. I will pass, however, on helping you mop your snack bar as I just finished mopping my entire auditorium.

[This message has been edited by BurneyFalls (edited June 05, 2005).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 04 Jun 2005 14:00 #10552

  • D. Bird
  • D. Bird's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 114
  • Karma: 0
Great stuff Jack. In my old biz, we survived precisely by changing. I've long admired the drive-in business and it's a way that many have changed in order to stay in the movie game. Since the chains long ago abandoned it, done properly and in the right market, they're very busy. If you haven't seen pictures of Jack's place, he does it right, and then some! I hope to see it this fall when I'm back out that way. In my new home, the sun can set as late as 9:55, now that may be the only kind of change I can't overcome....
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 05 Jun 2005 14:07 #10553

  • rodeojack
  • rodeojack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1242
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 0
OK.... then I guess offering you the bathrooms is out?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 09 Jun 2005 18:19 #10554

  • reelman
  • reelman's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 200
  • Karma: 0
Another threshold crossed by one of the majors. What's next?
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/la-fi-dvd9jun09,1,3148227.story

Warner Gets a Jump on Film Pirates in China
By Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer

In a groundbreaking response to movie piracy, Warner Bros. Entertainment released its latest film on DVD in China the same day it debuted in U.S. theaters.

The goal for Warner is to battle rampant piracy in China by giving movie fans a legitimate alternative to bootlegs. But the boldness of Warner's action, which it took last week with no fanfare, was tempered by its choice of movie: "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants," a relatively low-budget film that the studio had not planned on releasing in Chinese theaters.

Nevertheless, several industry executives said they believed it was the first time a major U.S. studio had taken a movie scheduled for a wide-scale theatrical run and released it simultaneously on DVD in another country.

"It's a necessary move," said movie industry analyst Tom Adams of Adams Media Research. "It's obviously not as good as having control of the Chinese market, but it's about the next best thing that you can do."

Craig M. Hoffman, a spokesman for Warner Bros.' anti-piracy efforts, said the studio was not necessarily looking to apply the same strategy to combat bootlegging in the U.S. or other countries.

"That region presents, if you will, the 'perfect storm' of piracy," Hoffman said, noting that Chinese pirates do not have to contend with the government quotas and review boards that restrict Hollywood's access to the market. "This region needed something like this to see if [a] legitimate product could compete under these conditions."

The Motion Picture Assn. of America contends that the major studios lose more than $3.5 billion — about 18% of last year's revenue from feature films — annually to disc and videotape bootleggers, plus an undetermined amount to online movie swappers. The MPAA has responded by conducting more raids and seizures against bootleggers, but studio executives have also stressed the need to compete with pirates in the marketplace — particularly overseas.

According to an April report by the U.S. trade representative, at least 90% of virtually every type of copyrighted work sold in China is counterfeit. China has only about 2,500 screens and 1.3 billion people, and the Chinese government allows only a few U.S. movies to be exhibited there. Most of the studios' movies reach Chinese viewers only on disc or videotape, which usually arrive months after the movie had its premiere in U.S. theaters.

Bootleggers in China face no such shortages or delays — they can download illicitly recorded copies of almost any movie within days of its U.S. premiere, then burn those copies onto discs. As a result, Chinese movie fans typically buy pirated versions long before legitimate versions of the films become available.

Warner's accelerated release of the "Pants" DVD in China appears to have beaten the pirates to the market, but it could backfire globally. Bootleggers could use the Chinese DVDs to create high-quality copies that spread quickly around the world, either over the Internet or as counterfeit discs.

Hoping to make unauthorized copies of "Pants" less appealing outside China, Warner included no extra features on the DVD. It also added Mandarin subtitles that cannot be hidden, said Yotam Ben-Ami, an anti-piracy executive at the studio.

Executives at other studios argued that Warner was not taking much of a gamble. The potential market in China and among pirates is small for a "chick flick" like "Pants," which follows four young women who take turns wearing a single pair of jeans that magically fits their different sizes. The movie grossed $9.8 million in its opening weekend at U.S. theaters.

As of Wednesday, no copies of the "Pants" DVD were reported on two websites that track the arrival of bootlegged movies online. Nor were there any versions of the movie that had been recorded illicitly in U.S. theaters.

Even a low-risk movie can provide some insights into the market, though, and particularly into the way customers respond to the early availability of legitimate products. Those lessons could prove valuable in other countries with high piracy rates, such as Russia and much of Southeast Asia.

"We will closely monitor the impact of this release on our other businesses to determine whether to follow this same release strategy with more high-profile titles," said Jim Cardwell, president of Warner Home Video.

The major studios' strategy of delaying home video releases until months after a movie's premiere has guaranteed pirates an exclusive window of sorts. Until the official DVD and VHS release, the only version of a movie available for viewing at home is a pirated one.

Some independent production companies, including Mark Cuban and Todd Wagner's 2929 Entertainment and Morgan Freeman and Lori McCreary's Revelations Entertainment, plan to release movies online or on DVD at the same time as they reach theaters. But even though the major Hollywood studios have been releasing DVDs closer to the theatrical premiere, Adams said, he doubted that they would ever put them out at the same time.

"That would be silly," Adams said. "People are still going and buying several billion tickets a year, and it's that exposure and word of mouth … that drives the DVD payday."

And the DVD payday is the one that really counts. Adams said home video sales and rentals accounted for 60% of the U.S. revenue for feature films last year, while ticket sales accounted for only 23%.

Warner Bros. has been unusually aggressive in its efforts to crack the huge Chinese market. Last fall it began manufacturing DVDs there in a joint venture with a Chinese partner, and it opened a state-of-the-art multiplex in 2002.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 26 Jun 2005 01:47 #10555

  • revrobor
  • revrobor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1109
  • Thank you received: 21
  • Karma: -8
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, helvetica">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by slapintheface:
The end of union projectionists may be one of the best things to happen in the theater bsns for some time. This should be looked upon as a pos not a negative as this will bring down cost for all big and small.No union no health ins. no 401k. THey have sucked the life out of theaters for years with way over priced pay checks..<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I will be the first to admit that there were some poor projectionists in the I.A. but to say the union "...sucked the life out of the theatres with way overpriced paychecks" is an erroneous character assination of all professional operators.

The high wages and benefits you read about today are a fairly new innovation in the I.A. I left the I.A. in 1971 (after 21 years) and had no retirement package or any other benefits. My father retired from the I.A. in the early 70s (after 35 years) and received a whopping $50 a month retirement. Hardly enough to suck the life out of the theatres.

If you're looking for someone to blame for the poor business and low wages in most corporate multiplexes look to the bottom-liners sitting in their plush offices at corporate headquarters who attempt to run all their theatres from there without knowing anything about the demographics in the communities where those theatres are located and the low quality of much of the product that has been coming out of "Hollywood" for the last 30 years.



Bob Allen
The Old Showman
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: this sums up my worries..... 26 Jun 2005 06:13 #10556

  • zedpha
  • zedpha's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 18
  • Karma: 0
So Warner Bros takes the risk out of getting a digital copy of a movie by releasing the DVD the same day that they release the movie? Novel approach.

Let's see WB do that with a blockbuster movie...

As the Chinese pop star said to his audience "...what would you rather do buy my CD for 200 yuan, or get a pirated copy for 20?" No prizes for guessing the answer.


I'm out, Zedpha
PS - Apologies for the bad paraphrasing.

[This message has been edited by zedpha (edited June 26, 2005).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.522 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction