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TOPIC: Rated R

Re: Rated R 26 Sep 2007 14:59 #16337

  • revrobor
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, helvetica">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Cinemateer:
<B>
Exactly. What Newbie is essentially trying to do is bypass the MPAA rating by imposing their own morals or views on a film. What is considered "damaging to a young mind" means something different to everyone. You can't say one R-rated film is worse than another because that is only your opinion. There was no way I was going to take my 9-yr old son to see "Transformers" after screening it myself no matter how much he begged, yet the auditorium was filled with very young children. It's all a matter of opinion, rating aside.

There are many PG films that have "good lessons" too, but even one or two "bad" parts make it a no-no for many parents. Besides, "good lessons" is even debatable depending on each family's values and beliefs. Some PG movies don't have any swearing, nudity, drugs, smoking, etc., so most would consider it a "good" movie, yet it may have some issues like teen pregnancy or religion that would be objectionable by some.

I wouldn't pass out flyers or give refunds or anything. Just pick a policy based on the MPAA rating system and stick with it and you can't get yourself into trouble.

If you feel that strongly about how "bad" a film is to kids, don't book it.</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I have been in this business long enough to have been involved in it when exhibitors felt a responsibility to the community and would indeed pick and choose what films they would show (and they were not anywhere near the garbage that's being pumped out today). But today many exhibitors hide behind the excuse "we don't make the films and the public has a right to see what they want". If it's garbage they want then let them go to the corporate multiplex or to the "I don't give a damn about the community I just want to make money" independent exhibitor's place. They won't see it at my "family friendly" house.

Bob Allen
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Re: Rated R 27 Sep 2007 15:37 #16338

  • tratcliff
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All this controversy and moral debate is why we do not show "R" rated movies at all.
Sure we have missed out on the income from the "Forrest Gump"s and "3:10 To Yuma"s, but it is worth it.
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Re: Rated R 27 Sep 2007 20:26 #16339

  • rufusjack
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We are currently playing our first two "r" rated movies since we opened 10 mos. ago (3:10 to Yuma and Superbad).

Remember that my background is owning video stores going on for 15 years now. Over the past 15 years I have come to realize that the overwhelming majority of parents of 12-15 year olds have no problem letting their kids watch "R" rated movies.

With 3:10 to Yuma, we have had no problem mixing kids with adults as the kids have had no desire to see it.

With Superbad, we have had no problem mixing kids with adults as the adults have not been rushing to see it. We have let 13-14 year olds in with out their parents. We know most of them and their families. We know the parents who would have a problem with their kids seeing these movies. That the good thing about being in a small town. On occasion we have mentioned to parents that the movie is very vulgar when we think the parents might want to know.

As far as the government imposing laws about who can get into to see a movie: I have been extremely involved in government relations with the video industry. I have lobbied both in Washington D.C. and my state capital. Thanks in part to the efforts of the EMA (Entertainment Merchants Association-formerly VSDA (video stores) and the IEMA; (Game folks) all attempts to legislate who can have access to video games based on content and ratings have been thrown out in court. I have no reason that any attempt to do so with movies would result in the same outcome.

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Re: Rated R 27 Sep 2007 21:26 #16340

  • rdetzler
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havent booked an R film in nearly two years, no one in my town comes tgo them whether they are great films or not. I let the multiplex play them, they can have them since no one who sees them typically buys concessions, combined with the admittance policy hassles makes them not worth the effort

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Re: Rated R 27 Sep 2007 22:32 #16341

  • dsschoenborn
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Back to the main question is yes we do like you do. As long as the parent buys the ticket then the under 17 person can come in.

Mike R rated films on airplans are sanitized like they are for TV.

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Re: Rated R 27 Sep 2007 22:44 #16342

  • slapintheface
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Funny are best per capita is on r rated movies...
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Re: Rated R 28 Sep 2007 09:21 #16343

  • Cinemateer
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This is such a hard topic to come to a conclusion on because of that distinction between the definitions of "good" and "bad". They mean different things to different people, even the exhibitors. Being an ultra conservative when it comes to family friendly movies (an R-rated movie will never make it's way into my theater), I often have more objections to PG-13 movies than R-rated movies because even the "family friendly" theaters show PG-13 movies when they don't show R's, so "bad" things are much more accessible. There is a reason for that "13" designation however, and the line between PG-13 and R are getting very, very blurred.

Since the exhibitor has the right to show what they want, and if an exhibitor is "family friendly", then there are VERY few movies that are truly "clean". Even CARS has some questionable parts and don't even get me started on "Robots" and "Ants". I've never understood why studios insist on putting in unnecessary scenes that keep parents from letting their children see a good movie. Was the masturbation scene in Transformers REALLY necessary for the plot?

So where do you draw the line? One bad word and it's out? One bare bottom? One bedroom scene, even if there is no nudity? I just don't see how a person can regulate the movies they show, regardless of the rating. We may even overregulate without knowing it. That's why we need to rely on the rating system to stay impartial.
"In a place like this, the magic is all around you. The trick is to see it." -Martin Landau
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Re: Rated R 28 Sep 2007 19:50 #16344

Wow - I never expected such a great response!

Thanks - i have only been doing this 6 months now and glad this forum is here cause I have learned so much for you all. And still am!

(Mainly not to book crappy movies like Good Luck Chuck ever again)

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Re: Rated R 28 Sep 2007 21:30 #16345

  • rodeojack
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Picturehouse, don't worry... if you have your own theatre, you WILL book the occasional dog. Predicting your customers' likelihood of attendance is one of the great mysteries of this business! After 35 some-odd years, I could name a huge list of films that, had my crystal ball been working, I would have run the other way from... fast!

Cinemateer... perhaps this is what tends to mold the independent exhibitor to his community. Moral norms do tend to shift from one place to another... and your survival will depend on your ability to (eventually) read the tea leaves.
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Re: Rated R 29 Sep 2007 18:58 #16346

  • Mike
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/26/us/26rating.html

Did you guys read this article? I don't think cCongress is planning laws because the films have been sanitized. I was on a plane and I recall Get Shorty which had a F count of like 432 and they changed them to fuzzy, funny, focused, etc. And they changed the opening plane crash into a train wreck. But it seems they have stopped doing it as the choices have become too dense.

Michael Hurley
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Re: Rated R 30 Sep 2007 06:22 #16347

  • Pieman
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Here in Australia the ratings ARE law..we have
G for general audiences

PG parental guidence recommended for under 15

M for mature audiences over 15

MA Anyone under 15 MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian over 18

R No one under 18 is permitted

There has been a lot of MA films. The silly thing is, the kids just have to say they are 15 and get in. At 15 they don't have any form of identification as they cannot get a learners permit to drive until 16 or get their drivers licence until 18. So really they should just use R if its soo bad. Its interesting how the population of teenagers change from nealy all 15 when theres an MA show on compared to everyone being 14 when there's not. Our ticket price is, child 3 to 14 years old, so when they turn 15 they are adult!
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Re: Rated R 30 Sep 2007 12:59 #16348

  • lionheart
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Pieman, if you could lower your dividing age between adult and child tickets, it might help with those who keep magically changing their ages. Most cinemas in my area use age 12 as the cutoff. With a lower dividing age, I'm sure it would make it much easier for you to discourage some of the age changers. Perhaps your competition uses 15 as the cutoff for children's tickets, so it would be really hard to drop it to 12, but the lower you can go, the easier it will be to separate the groups.

Then again, the age changes might not be as much of a concern to you as they are a curiosity. I guess I'm just amazed that somebody 14 years old could buy a child's ticket. When I was a kid the dividing age was 12 at the local theater. When I would ask for a child's ticket at age 10 they would question me, "How old are you?" and to my sister "Is he really 10?" because I was very big for my age. They would then begrudingly sell me the ticket. The next year when I was 11 and going to the movies, I was prepared for another round of questioning my honesty (which I found very upsetting as a child), but actually felt relieved to learn they had lowered the age to 10, so I was able to buy an adult ticket without the iquisition of buying the child's ticket. At that time, the difference was probably about 25 cents, so the price increase didn't bother me much compared to the hassle I had previously received.

So, I guess the lesson I can glean from that experience is to be very careful when challenging kids on their ages. You could be alienating a potential lifelong customer. If there had been another cinema in my little town, I probably would have asked to go elsewhere in hopes of finding less hassle. Of course, the flip side of the coin is that some kids do lie about their ages to save money or gain admittance to a film they are not old enough to see. However, what can you do if someone who isn't old enough to carry ID is lying to you? Not much it seems. I guess we just have to be prepared to give some undeserved discounts to those seeking cheaper tickets. However, if someone wants to see a Rated R film, I have to say that I would require ID if their age was questionable.

I guess for PG-13 films, we might have the same problems as Pieman and the MA rated films in Australia. Kids can say they are 12 for kids' prices one day and then say they are 13 to see a PG-13 film another day. Since I am in the early stages for my new theater, I think I will make the dividing age a little lower, probably 10 as it was when I was a kid. Or maybe I can go with one price for all admission. That seems like a better solution, but it might not be the best choice for my theater. And we still can't check ID for a PG-13 film.

Short of issuing theater ID cards, I don't see any way to control the situation completely. We just have to determine what our policy will be and stay consistent. I suppose that is what all of you do as well. Determine your own policy and stay with it. For me it is going to be that we will require ID for rated R films when the customer's age is questionable, just like buying alcohol or cigarettes. I will not allow parents to buy tickets and drop the kids off. This is a conservative little town and I live here now, so I must be as conservative as possible. That way when I play a rated R film, I can at least say to those who are complaining that I'm playing it that I strictly enforce the MPAA rating policy and those that choose to see it are old enough to do so according to established standards.

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Re: Rated R 01 Nov 2007 01:57 #16349

  • BurneyFalls
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You all know there has been a glut of R rated movies this fall. Many of them are quite good, but still get no business. My question is, was the MPAA sleeping through the first five minutes of WE OWN THE NIGHT? Was I the only person who felt that scene was inappropriate for an R-rated film? The movie was very good, I just didn't understand why that scene didn't jack up the rating to NC-17.
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