Banner
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: The Best Seats

The Best Seats 18 Dec 2000 14:24 #994

  • poppajoe
  • poppajoe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 455
  • Karma: 0
I'm curious to know what you think the best place to sit in your theater is. I've read that two-thrids of the way back is the best viewing area with a 60 degree angle. What makes this area the best to view from. Or is it really the best area to sit in?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: The Best Seats 18 Dec 2000 14:50 #995

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Accidental double posting deleted.

[This message has been edited by John Pytlak (edited December 18, 2000).]
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: The Best Seats 18 Dec 2000 14:55 #996

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Standard SMPTE 196M specifies a preferred viewing distance of 3 screen heights from the screen for critical viewing of films in a screening room, with an allowed range of 2 to 4 screen heights. In other words, for a 20 x 48 foot "scope" picture, or a 20 x 37 foot "flat" 1.85:1 picture, the preferred distance would be 60 feet, although anywhere from 40 to 80 feet from the screen would be acceptable.

Sitting closer than 2 screen heights may make the grain too visible, especially for the less efficient (i.e. high magnification) "flat" format. Underexposure or force processing may also accentuate the graininess. IMHO, a well exposed 35mm movie can look very good even at a distance of 1 screen height. With current Digital Cinema projection systems using a 1280 x 1024 pixel display (less than many laptop computers), the pixel structure and lack of sharpness become very noticable close to the screen. Modern theatre designs have placed the audience much closer to the screen, with some seats even closer than one screen height.

The lower magnification required for larger formats like 70mm allow the audience to sit even closer to the screen because the image quality is so much better than smaller formats. So the audience can be more "involved" in the picture, with the peripheral vision engaged. That is why Todd-AO and Cinerama were such popular formats in their heyday.

John P. Pytlak
Senior Technical Specialist
EI Worldwide Technical Services
Research Labs, Building 69
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 716-477-5325
Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: The Best Seats 18 Dec 2000 21:46 #997

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 895
  • Thank you received: 17
  • Karma: 3
In other words John, in many of our new theatres...the best place would be out in the lobby!

We have one brand new multi-plex theatre here in Pa. that has it's BACK rows less then two screen heights from the screen.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: The Best Seats 19 Dec 2000 10:47 #998

  • John Pytlak
  • John Pytlak's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 891
  • Karma: 0
Roxy --- putting the audience close to the screen engages their peripheral vision and increases their involvement in the picture. But putting most of the audience closer than 40 feet from a 20 x 48 foot screen puts greatly increased demands on the quality of the projection.

The very wide screens and short throws in modern theatre designs often call for lenses with a very short focal length. Very short focal length lenses have a shallow depth of focus, making them more sensitive to "film flutter" or any gate misalignment. "Film flutter" is aggravated by the heat from very high power levels needed to light these huge screens. If a gain screen is used to get higher screen luminance, a wide auditorium demands that the screen be properly curved to distribute the light evenly throughout the auditorium. IMHO, 70mm prints are still needed to deliver optimum quality on huge screens larger than 25 feet high. Film can easily support excellent image quality at close viewing distances, but more care is needed to "do film right".



John P. Pytlak
Senior Technical Specialist
EI Worldwide Technical Services
Research Labs, Building 69
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: 716-477-5325
Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Telephone: +1 585-477-5325 Fax: +1 585-722-7243
E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.184 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction