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TOPIC: laws

laws 27 Sep 2004 17:06 #9046

  • fanboy
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i was wondering when looking for the right building to house a theather how do you find out what codes and laws that are needed for a movie theater
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Re: laws 27 Sep 2004 17:49 #9047

  • Ken Layton
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Laws vary so widely from location-to-location that it's best to talk with your city, county, and state building departments as well as your local fire marshall. Generally following the Universal Building Code and Fire Code is a good start, but frequently your local officials/inspectors may add stuff to it. Don't forget that some local officials may want some palm greasing for those sudden 'issues' that crop up at the last minute.
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Re: laws 28 Sep 2004 08:43 #9048

  • jimor
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Ken is certainly right, but if you are just starting out, you may do well to read the references under the topic "Cinema Projection" in this Forum. In addition to knowing codes and laws, it is essential to know the standards of projeciton to know if you can adapt a building within reason. For example, do you know how many screen heights back your seating should be? John's pages linked there lead you to the answers. It takes study to learn good projection, and even more study through the Archives here and elsewhere to learn the showmanship of exhibition which is what makes people want to come back to your cinema as opposed to others. If you want to reopen a movie palace, the road is more complicated still, and you would do well to learn the rehab regulations for an historic structure from such as the League of Historic American Theatres ( www.LHAT.org ) as well as the Theatre Historical Society of America at www.HistoricTheatres.org If you are new to all this, taking the time to read through the Archives and FAQs of this site will help immensely, and if time is pressing as to learning local regs, consult a local architect or builder who will know from experience. You should also consult an attorney specializing in real estate before you put any ink to paper!! BEST WISHES! Jim.
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
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