Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Lobby opening a free outsite movie theater
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: opening a free outsite movie theater

opening a free outsite movie theater 28 Feb 2004 10:52 #7652

  • mistake5
  • mistake5's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
I am thinking of opening a local, outside, bring your own lawn chair movie night for the residents in my village. I need to know where or how I can get movies to show. I am looking for old classics and up-to-date films. Can any one start me in the right direction.

[This message has been edited by mistake5 (edited February 28, 2004).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 28 Feb 2004 11:16 #7653

  • sals
  • sals's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 117
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 1
How many people do you think will come? If more than 100 or so, you may need to go to 35mm, which gets really expensive, equipment-wise. I have been the long time projectionist at the Bryant Park Film Festival in NY, which gets up to 12,000 people at a time and uses 35mm.

MId level 16mm projectors (the Bell & Howell with the vapor lamps) will give you a picture up to 9 x 12 nicely if it's really dark. Which it may not be when you're outside. Ambient light may interfere and you 'll have to put more light on the screen.

Video has been done too but the projector rental may be high in price for a model with enough lumens.

Swank.com could be a source for film.

Lots to think of....you'll need a power source too. I'd love to do this in my small town but the costs seem prohibitive.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 28 Feb 2004 11:27 #7654

  • mistake5
  • mistake5's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
Sal,
I have an e-mail into Swank as we speak.

The whole point of this is to offer a service to the community. I live in a small historical village. This would be perfect for the children and movie buffs alike. I would assume the The Village mayor would help me with cost or hire me as a non-for profit to by the equipment and keep it running.(I hope)
We have a jass night here every Monday night in the park. I estimante 50 to 75 people go to that.
Just picture family and friends bringing there lawn chairs and watching "What ever Happen to Baby Jane" (my favorite)on a quiet summer night!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 28 Feb 2004 22:30 #7655

  • sals
  • sals's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 117
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 1
If you have a small crowd, you might want to go with 16mm. You'll have to buy the projector(s)-- Xenon hopefully. Depending on your location, you might be able to rent them. You'd need a sound system and a Fast Fold screen (only if there's no breeze) or could fashion one that 's more permanent, using screen paint, maybe?

Try to get them to turn off the street lights for the show, it really helps!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 29 Feb 2004 11:11 #7656

  • Ken Layton
  • Ken Layton's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 860
  • Thank you received: 4
  • Karma: -1
Sounds like you'd fall under the "Parks & Recreation" category for film rentals from Swank.

I say go with 16mm films and get yourself a pair of xenon lamp models. That should get you a decent picture.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 01 Mar 2004 11:07 #7657

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • NOW ONLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5024
  • Thank you received: 41
  • Karma: 15
I repeat the old adage: assume makes an ass out of u and me. Talk to the Mayor first. What your proposing is expensive even if done cheaply. Free means you need funding. If you can't get it the show is over before you start.

Sal! Bryant Park: way cool. as a former NYC messenger service, cab driver, waiter and bartender who saw Bryant Park go from very nice to a junkie hell and then back to its phoenix reincarntaion it's a pleasure to say hello to someone who plays a small part. That film series is a great event! Congrats!

Michael Hurley
Impresario
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 02 Mar 2004 22:39 #7658

  • sals
  • sals's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 117
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 1
Thanks Mike! Bryant Park is a really fun job. First year, I was very pregnant running the show out of the back of a truck, I did most years, rode a bike to get there.

I'm not sure if I'll be doing it this year as I'll be busy with the new theater....

Sally
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 03 Mar 2004 07:32 #7659

  • jimor
  • jimor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 395
  • Karma: 0
Mistake5: here is an example of something just like you are talking about, on a small scale. A most unusual situation here in Milwaukee that I saw in the Sunday newspaper:

"Movie magic: Film buff transforms dingy Milwaukee alley into homemade
drive-in

By JIM STINGL
of the Journal Sentinel staff ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) (414-220-2017)

Sunday, August 4, 2002

It's not quite true that Milwaukee lost its last drive-in movie theater
when the 41 Twin Outdoor was bulldozed into history in April.

Paul Dorobialski ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) runs one, although it doesn't have a formal name. I've
heard him call it the two-car drive-in and the sidewalk cinema.

He doesn't advertise anywhere, except for sometimes sending out a
companywide e-mail at his day job. And you've probably never heard of
the movies he shows, mostly big-band musical shorties from the 1940s and
short subject films.

But you have to check out the way he transforms a dingy and, frankly,
dangerous looking dead-end cobblestone alley into a picture show.

"That's really odd. There's a film going in the alley," Bob Parduhn of
Bayside said when he stopped recently on his bicycle, captivated by such
a surprising find.

That reaction, and the fact that he stuck around and watched for a
while, is exactly the response Paul Dorobialski is seeking. This is his
Cinema Paradiso, and he loves visitors.

Paul, a burly man with maintenance-free hair and both pockets of his
work shirt filled with pens and little tools, is the caretaker of a
four-story warehouse at 170 S. 2nd St. in the Walker's Point
neighborhood. At about 10 o'clock on Wednesday and Friday nights in the
summer he drags an ancient projector outside on a loading dock in the
alley running along the south side of the warehouse.

He sets up a box full of loudspeakers next to it. And he attaches a
homemade screen, about 7-by-7 feet, to the side of the building and
swivels it out at a right angle to the wall.

Then -- and this is more than you need to know if you care more about
movie magic than movie mechanics -- he aims the projector at a mirror
that reverses the image that is then re-reversed back to normal when you
see it from the other side of the screen.

The resulting sound and picture are crystal clear. I remember what Paul
said when I admired his homemade setup. "Beauty is as beauty does."

There's room for two cars in the alley between the screen and the
sidewalk, but typically people on their way to bars or wherever in the
neighborhood just stand and watch.

When I went with my daughter on a Friday night, we sat in the alley on
old chairs that Paul helped us carry out of the warehouse. Motorcycles
and buses roared past on 2nd St. but could not drown out the movies.

On that particular night, Paul began by showing a documentary about
Summerfest from 1968. Then he went to an hourlong reel of "soundies,"
essentially three-minute-long early music videos that people used to pay
10 cents to see on video jukeboxes around the time of the Second World
War.

Sometimes people dance along, Paul said. Once when he was showing
cartoons, he had 25 children in the alley. They yelled "Goodbye,
mister," as they left. He liked that. Another night when he had a
particularly appreciative audience, he ran everything he had until 4
a.m.

Last year on an unseasonably warm Halloween night, he showed "The Rocky
Horror Picture Show." Usually, though, he avoids feature-length films
because they don't work as well for a drop-in theater with no time
schedule. He knows people have places to go.

People with curiosity deficits look at the strange sight but don't stop
even for a minute or two to make sure they're not hallucinating.
Sometimes people ask Paul if he charges admission (he doesn't). If
people complain that there's no concession stand, he points them to the
bar across the street, Just Art's Saloon, where you can get pizza and
sandwiches and such.

"We get a kick out of Paul," said Art Guenther, who owns the bar. "He's
a character. I like characters."

Paul just enjoys feeding film through a projector at 36 feet per minute.

"Some people like to go out for the evening," he says. "This is my
enjoyment, sharing my hobby with people."

A police officer stopped one time and hounded Paul about needing some
kind of permit. "What type?" Paul said. The cop didn't know, and he
never came back.

As you might guess, Paul Dorobialski didn't just get up one day as a
46-year-old man and decide to start presenting movies in an alley. He
remembers going to see "Bambi" at the old Pearl Theater in his Mitchell
St. neighborhood when he was about 6 and turning around most of the
movie to see where the pictures were coming from.

For his 12th birthday, he received a hand-cranked projector that he
promptly opened up and tried to rig with a motor. A few years later,
using money he earned ushering at the Modjeska Theater, he upgraded to a
used $35 16mm projector and constructed a movie theater in his basement.
The screen was a 4-by-6-foot piece that he talked demolition workers
into letting him cut from the big screen at the doomed Granada Theater
in Milwaukee.

He would go on to work at Roa Films [the former Astor theater] on the east side and to serve as
projectionist at many local theaters, including the Tosa, Times, Uptown,
Princess, Ruby Isle and Paradise.

These days, Paul is a single man living in West Allis. He has a business
restoring jukebox amplifiers.

His full-time job is in the engineering department at the Milwaukee
Public Museum, where he spends his days replacing light bulbs throughout
the building. It fits that a man who literally sheds light on the past
would find satisfaction in filling an alley in long-forgotten flickering
images in his spare time.

His outdoor theater concept began in about 1996 when he was caretaker
for a building near 1st and Oregon. He would aim his projector from a
fourth-floor window to the side of white semitrailer on the ground
below.

Later he painted a white square on the side of the building for use as a
screen. The building sold, and he moved over to the current 2nd St.
location and started showing movies there last summer.

My daughter, from the over-entertained generation, wants to go back to
the two-car drive-in one of these nights. She knows a rare find when she
sees one."



[This message has been edited by jimor (edited March 03, 2004).]
Jim R. (new E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) member: www.HistoricTheatres.org
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 03 Mar 2004 14:12 #7660

  • outaframe
  • outaframe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 672
  • Karma: 0
JIM, that's a charming story about the "Cinema Paradiso in the alley" you quoted from the newspaper... Unfortunately, the reporter who wrote it displays the lack of techinical and factual accuracy that is so common when someone from the media does this kind of story, and this one gives birth to some myths which will probably live on in many reader's minds from now on... The "video jukeboxes" he mentions as having existed in the 1940's NEVER were!... There MAY have been some kind of FILM playback setup in conjunction with a jukebox, but I never have seen one, and I grew up during that time frame... He also refers to a "boxfull of speakers" which COULD mean a single (multi driver 3-way system) speaker in one enclosure, but is more suggestive of a multi-CHANNEL system of some kind, which ALSO did not exist in the timeframe he refers to (except in a handfull of theaters which showed "Fantasia" with the roadshow setup)... He further mentions "film feeding through the projector at 36 feet per minute."... This rate does NOT correspond with any 35mm or 16mm sound or silent projection speed that I'm aware of... The mirror and screen setup he mentions are evidently some sort of homemade rear projection system, but I wonder about the light level, even with the small 7 foot screen he details... Like I said, this is a charming story, and it makes for interesting reading, but it would have been a LOT more informative IF he had gotten the facts right before he wrote it!...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 03 Mar 2004 18:46 #7661

  • Ken Layton
  • Ken Layton's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 860
  • Thank you received: 4
  • Karma: -1
The Mills "Panoram" was a self contained 'movie jukebox' manufactured in the 1940's. It used 16mm sound film (called Soundies) that was reverse image printed as the Panoram rear projected onto a ground glass screen. It had an RCA 16mm projector that was similar to the famous 400 series projector models. Information on this machine is available at www.film-center.com

In the 1960's there was the famous Scopitone movie jukebox (with magnetic sound 16mm film printed normally).
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 05 Mar 2004 12:50 #7662

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • NOW ONLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5024
  • Thank you received: 41
  • Karma: 15
Is there a problem with reh=gistration/passwords? Mike
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 08 Mar 2004 19:22 #7663

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • NOW ONLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5024
  • Thank you received: 41
  • Karma: 15
"small historic village".......okay which village is near Bryant Park is what I want to know! As I come from a town of 6500 with 36000 in the county and 1 million in the state: small means different things to people.

Michael Hurley
Impresario
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: opening a free outsite movie theater 10 Mar 2004 22:14 #7664

  • crshedd
  • crshedd's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 43
  • Karma: 0
i am also looking to do this in my small (4000) community.

swank can provide dvd's for older titles fairly cheap. i have found businesses that would sponsor the film each week.

next, would be a projection system. there is a place in boston that does this type of thing for a fee (about $2500 per show). i am looking at rear projection screen, dvd projector (2500-3000 lumens-should be able to start at dusk), and a sound system. total cost is about $8000.

the chamber of commerece is willing to lease equipment under their name and pay for part of the lease. our town rec director is maybe willing to operate it.

we'll see how things go.

'hey! there's no party here!'
jeff spicoli
fast times at ridgemont high
'hey! there's no party here!'
jeff spicoli
fast times at ridgemont high
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.406 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction