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TOPIC: they come to the movie and not the theatre

they come to the movie and not the theatre 09 Sep 2013 12:42 #40278

  • Mike
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I was on vacation last week. Went to the Water's Edge Cinema in downtown Provincetown, Mass... (don't tell John at Wellfleet! :) ) These are two teeny theatres showing first run art house. 2nd floor. There is an elevator. Provincetown is a very busy place even after Labor Day. We saw The Butler and Blue Jasmine. Both are very ofddly configured theatres... in one you walk in front of the screen and up a small aisle on the far side to get to seats. The other is smaller and was nearly full. We sat in the front row. 6' from eyeballs to screen. Screen was 4' off floor and 12' wide. The place was sold out. I adjusted and enjoyed the film. Both were digital and there is a bit of annoying electronic swirl pattern visible on while surfaces... I've seen that in lots of theatres... anyway... my point is..... no one would hold this theatre up as "the way to see a movie" but even with the oddities it was pleasant, well run, nice people in charge, clean rest room, my point is... people wanted to see the MOVIE and they went and sat happily through odd seats, size, distance, access, etc. When you have movies people want to see: they will come. Or ...if you show it they will come.
Michael Hurley
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they come to the movie and not the theatre 09 Sep 2013 16:12 #40279

  • lionheart
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They will come if:

There is a movie they want to see... AND... if the customer perceives your theater to provide the greatest "utility" of all the places they have an option to see it. Utility is a word they use in economics class. It essentially means value, but not necessarily in a way that can be measured by money or numbers. It could be the most convenient location, the most beautiful location, the cheapest location, the location with the best concessions, the location with the most comfortable seats, the location where all their friends are going, or any number of things that a customer values. It could be a combination of things that the customer values as well.

If you are the only place in town to see the movie, then it may just be a matter of whether or not more distant options provide greater utility or whether they want to wait for the DVD release.

But, first and foremost is having a movie that people want to see... as Mike said. If you can convince them it's a movie they want to see, when they initially didn't, then your marketing efforts are to be highly commended.
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they come to the movie and not the theatre 09 Sep 2013 19:11 #40280

  • revrobor
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lionheart wrote:
They will come if:
If you can convince them it's a movie they want to see, when they initially didn't, then your marketing efforts are to be highly commended.

This is so true and one of the elements missing in today's exhibition industry as many theatre owners leave the promotion up to the distributor.
Bob Allen
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they come to the movie and not the theatre 10 Sep 2013 15:18 #40281

  • Wurlitzer7
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There was a day when it was just the opposite. You got a stage show, organist, Movietone news, orchestra in the pit, cartoon and then the feature. Could a day return to some of those programming elements? Presentation was a top priority from the light bulbs in the marquee to the ushers finding your seat. That's one reason why movie palaces were built. If the movie was bad you were seated in a castle, Spanish garden, deco d├ęcor or classic French design. In Chicago 'back in the day' probably over 1500 musicians, stage hands, booth personnel, actors, specialty acts and staff worked in the theatre and then supported the neighboring businesses. The movie palaces really did create jobs and a positive support to our culture.
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they come to the movie and not the theatre 11 Sep 2013 06:36 #40282

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AMEN! And it can be done today (except in the big box multiplexes).
Bob Allen
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they come to the movie and not the theatre 11 Sep 2013 16:09 #40283

  • Mike
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I am a great believer in the pizazz of show biz. We do "the show starts on the sidewalk" and take it very seriously. That is all a matter of course. The Provincetown theatre is pretty nice in many ways and 50% of nothing is still nothing so we were glad to have it as it was. I've seen movies in some very bad surroundings: ceiling falling in, dirty, talkers, etc. etc. and still enjoyed the movie. The truly grand theatres were built in a very competitive time where theatres were at war with each other. That is less of an issue today.
Michael Hurley
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