Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Lobby 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer

35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 19 Jul 2011 23:34 #36687

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 889
  • Thank you received: 16
  • Karma: 3
Deluxe, Technicolor Begin Orderly Retreat From Film Services
3:52 PM 7/18/2011 by Carolyn Giardina

After a century of motion picture film business, companies ink unprecedented subcontracting agreements.

Deluxe Entertainment Services Group and Technicolor have inked three-year subcontracting agreements that effectively reduce the global footprint of film services.

Per the agreement, Technicolor will subcontract its 35mm bulk release printing business to Deluxe in North America, while Deluxe will subcontract its 35mm print distribution business in the US to Technicolor. Additionally, Deluxe will subcontract its 35mm/16mm color negative processing business to Technicolor in London. Financial details were not disclosed.

For many who receive Monday’s news, it will underscore the approaching end of the era where film dominated the theatrical motion picture industry. For nearly a century, Deluxe and Technicolor have been pillars in film services. Technicolor’s film development business dates back to 1914, while Deluxe has been processing film since 1915. Today, the bulk of these competing businesses represent a growing range of digital entertainment services including Blu-Ray authoring, digital postproduction and digital cinema distribution.

"Today’s agreement with Technicolor is the result of significant changes in our industry enabled by new digital technologies causing the rapid transition from film to digital," said Cyril Drabinsky, president and CEO of Deluxe. "This agreement will help maintain a high consistency of service for our customers through the remaining life of film."

With these changes, Technicolor will place its 35mm release print orders with Deluxe’s film laboratories in Hollywood and Toronto on behalf of its customers. In doing so, the planned closure of Technicolor’s North Hollywood lab is expected to be completed this week, while its 65 and 70mm print business will move to Technicolor’s Glendale facility. Technicolor’s film lab in Mirabel, Canada -- just outside Montreal -- will close, representing a loss of 178 jobs.

Technicolor will begin servicing Deluxe’s US 35mm release print distribution in September, and Deluxe’s UK 35mm/16mm color negative processing at Technicolor’s Pinewood facility within the week.

Deluxe will cease 35mm/16mm negative processing services at both of its facilities in the London area, one in the Soho district and the other in Denham.Deluxe will provide 35mm bulk release printing at its Denham and other European facilities.

As part of the agreement, Deluxe -- which has no lab in Thailand -- will also subcontract its film printing to Technicolor in Thailand.

Drabinsky told The Hollywood Reporter that while difficult to truly forecast, he believes that for at least another five years there will be release print business in North America, and even longer in the European market.

Deluxe, a wholly-owned subsidiary of MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, estimates that of 41,597 screens in North America, more than 19,000 -- nearly half -- have been converted to digital cinema. Drabinsky estimates that the European digital cinema transition is closer to 20-25% penetration. Digital cinematography, he suggested, now represents about 50% of features worldwide and roughly 80% of the TV market in North America and Europe. Feature archiving at the studios remains an area that continues to rely on film.


www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/deluxe-te...derly-retreat-212459
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 22 Jul 2011 13:22 #36698

  • slapintheface
  • slapintheface's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 2417
  • Thank you received: 17
  • Karma: -38
Film will be around in Tailand ,Cambodia etc for few more years. By the end of 2012 I believe the US will be about 85 to 90 % converted. This will leave 10 to 15 % film those are not odds I would want to have with a theater.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 22 Jul 2011 15:31 #36699

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 889
  • Thank you received: 16
  • Karma: 3
I'm currently shopping around for digital, and have every intention to have it installed before the end of 2012. We hear so many different stories as to when the end of film will be, but I'm not taking any chances and will be converted before that happens.

However, I still find it difficult to believe that film will be gone in the North American markets by the end of 2013. It is now the middle of 2011 and the conversion has only covered 50% so far. It just seems impossible that the other 50% can be converted in only 18 months, especially when considering the present economic situation.

Of course one could argue that if there are still roughly 19 to 20 thousand screens unconverted that half of those may not be converted and will close. If that is the case, then we are presently two thirds done. It's a pretty sad situation when an industry is willing to throw away up to 25% of it's customer base in order to save themselves money. But, that's business... right? Too bad about the people that will lose their place of business, who have worked hard to get them, or to keep them. Too bad about the many small communities that will lose their only theatre, to never have one again. Too bad about the many moviegoers from those communities that will have to drive great distances to go to the movies or are forced to give up the theatrical experience and therefore forced to view their movies on alternate media.

To quote from the article above about Technicolor and Deluxe partnering: "Drabinsky told The Hollywood Reporter that while difficult to truly forecast, he believes that for at least another five years there will be release print business in North America, and even longer in the European market".
These people who are the providers of 35mm film have now suggested that film will still be in North America possibly through 2016, a few years longer than what many are presently predicting. I hope that is the case. While it won't effect me, I'm glad that it may give a little more time to those that aren't in a position to make the change before the end of 2013.

PS. Although I will be converted before the end time, I have no intention to remove, or take out of usable service, my 35mm equipment. ;)
Last Edit: 22 Jul 2011 15:32 by RoxyVaudeville.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 22 Jul 2011 19:59 #36701

  • rufusjack
  • rufusjack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1462
  • Thank you received: 33
  • Karma: -6
Roxy,
Ignore the number of screens and look at what % .of gross has been converted. My estimates are that we are at the 70% mark now & will be at 90%+ by end of 2012. So the studios are not ignoring that much of the public at all.
Last Edit: 22 Jul 2011 20:00 by rufusjack.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 23 Jul 2011 15:37 #36703

  • revrobor
  • revrobor's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1130
  • Thank you received: 22
  • Karma: -8
Well Jack, to ignore 10% of the public would be a shameful blot on the exhibition and production industries.
Bob Allen
The Old Showman
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 23 Jul 2011 17:55 #36707

  • AllenD
  • AllenD's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 77
  • Thank you received: 4
  • Karma: -1
Whether we like it or not, and I'm not suggesting that anyone on this forum has to like it, the studios will save so much money with digital prints that they'll never notice a loss of 10%.
I do think that all but the smallest theatre will be able to afford to go digital if they take advantage of VPF's and the various "deals" that are out there.

I think that Rufusjack's numbers are pretty darn close to reality.

On a positive note, while it isn't doing (small town) Iron Man-style hold over business, Harry Potter is doing very nicely on his second week and Captain America is a very pleasant surprise.

AllenD
Last Edit: 23 Jul 2011 17:55 by AllenD.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 27 Jul 2011 01:03 #36731

  • ttroidl
  • ttroidl's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 370
  • Thank you received: 4
  • Karma: 1
Has anyone come up with a decent DC for Drive-in's w/o being priced out of line???

and do they require a new light source or do we reuse our Lamphouses???
tony.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: sharynf

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 27 Jul 2011 05:43 #36733

  • Transit Drive in
  • Transit Drive in's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 257
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 4
Right now, it's around $75,000 per screen for a Barco Projector, GDC Server, and the Cinedigm Library.

You cannot use an old lamphouse, everthing has to be new. The old projector is scrap metal in a few more years.

3D is extra.

Rick
"As long as there are sunsets and stars at night, there will always be drive-in movies."
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 27 Jul 2011 15:17 #36734

  • sharynf
  • sharynf's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: 1
My 2 cents:

"Classic films" - unless people/businesses are out there 'converting to digital - I would think there would still be a need for 'traditional' i.e. 35mm ... as I hope people still want to view films made 'before Digital' - oh well, just a thought; other than that... ''loss carried forward' on each year's tax form might absorb it?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 27 Jul 2011 16:09 #36735

  • lionheart
  • lionheart's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 312
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 3
I hope you are right, Sharynf, but over time the existing prints will deteriorate, and I doubt if they will strike many new film prints. I'm not sure how the classics divisions at the distributors will handle the situation, but over time they will likely digitize the popular classics, and maybe some of the unpopular ones.

Many have already been digitized in the form of DVD and Blu-Ray. I think that is the way it will go. Already many newbies who visit this forum say something like, "I want to open a theater that shows classic movies from Blu-Ray." As long as the screen isn't too large, and they have a good sound system, they can probably put on a decent show. I'm not saying that kind of thing will make a lot of money, but it is technically feasible.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 28 Jul 2011 04:57 #36741

  • slapintheface
  • slapintheface's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 2417
  • Thank you received: 17
  • Karma: -38
Most CLASSIC FILMS are on DVD so they play very well on digital. Patrons dont care if its 35 mm or digital. Sad but true.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: 35MM may be around just a tad bit longer 28 Jul 2011 15:39 #36744

  • rufusjack
  • rufusjack's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1462
  • Thank you received: 33
  • Karma: -6
revrobor wrote:
Well Jack, to ignore 10% of the public would be a shameful blot on the exhibition and production industries.

Bob,

Would you spend more money that you bring in to attract someone? You should not so why do we expect the studios to do such too?

I would say half of that 10% (and we talking about ticket selling revenue not locations) have a location 20 mins away to go to.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.253 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction