Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Lobby What's Happened To Shelf Life?
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: What's Happened To Shelf Life?

What's Happened To Shelf Life? 21 Aug 2001 10:50 #1954

  • dr
  • dr's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 314
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 5
I guess the days of a movie running for 10 to 8 weeks are over. Remember "ET", "Star Wars" and "Ghostbusters". Some movie that have come after those great hits have been just as good, but for some reason haven't had the staying power. Anyone have any ideas as to why this has happened. Is it because of the moviegoers and a shorter attention spans? What can we do to get some other big, long run films?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: What's Happened To Shelf Life? 21 Aug 2001 14:43 #1955

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5061
  • Thank you received: 45
  • Karma: 15
Pretty simple really. If you open a film like The Mummy Retreads on over 6000 screens it's a pretty safe bet that everyone....or most of the eventual gross can see it on opening weekend. Then: next weekend it's on to the next best thing! In any event the customers are really in a "what's new and hot" or we'll see it on video. And just when you thought you'd get what you wanted: watch how theatres like me howl when only 1400 or 2500 prints are released and I don't get one!

Mike Hurley
www.bigscreenbiz.com
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: What's Happened To Shelf Life? 21 Aug 2001 16:09 #1956

  • RoxyVaudeville
  • RoxyVaudeville's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 895
  • Thank you received: 17
  • Karma: 3
Mike is absolutely correct. In the "old" days before the megaplex when films opened on 600 to 1000 screens, and were only on one or two screens in a given market, and not at the same complex... shows, especially on weekends, were often sold out for weeks. Moviegoers, who were turned away from their first choice would then select another film rather then go home, and thus many other films grosses were helped by the overflow. Often lesser films that would have had a difficult time seeing the light of day, succeeded when the blockbuster sent patrons to them, and the good word of mouth that they otherwise would have never recieved made them a hit. Other then the fact that the current short runs have increased the average film rental as the entire engagement now falls in the high percentage weeks, the other real casualty of all this overbuilding is what it has done to the other films that were helped by all those sellouts of the past.

This is another case of exhibitors shooting themslves in the foot. The major distributors are laughing all the way to the bank.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: What's Happened To Shelf Life? 22 Aug 2001 18:10 #1957

  • Rialto
  • Rialto's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 249
  • Karma: 1
Long runs...here's a few of ours:
You Can Count On Me - 20 Weeks
O Brother Where Art Thou - 18 Weeks
Billy Elliot - 18 Weeks
Best in Show 10 Weeks
Himalaya 7 weeks
The Dish 7 weeks
Songcatcher - starting week #9

You want long runs - get into niche films - not only do you get to play them - if your market will support them, but the terms are also better. Unless there are massive theatre closings and wholesale scaling back on the number of prints available, mainstream film is now a one to two week business. Even the next Star Wars will probably only do huge business for about 2 weeks.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: What's Happened To Shelf Life? 29 Aug 2001 11:59 #1958

  • take2
  • take2's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 271
  • Karma: 0
Although the life of a movie is rather short lived in the U.S., you will find that many current movies like "Pearl Harbor", "Tomb Raider", and "Jurassic Park III", to name a few enjoy extended life overseas. The reason is better scheduling and most theaters overseas don't have enough screens to acommodate several big films. This fact helps give the audience time to find the movie.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: What's Happened To Shelf Life? 01 Sep 2001 18:43 #1959

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5061
  • Thank you received: 45
  • Karma: 15
Take 2 needs to take a few trips. Films are released much later overseas because the US market is what build buzz on Hollywood films. Also there are plenty of multiplexes the world over and they are just as intensely scheduled as the USA. Are they better? No more and no less. Films get old everywhere at about the same amount of exposure. I like Rialto's comments but they need to be prefaced by "if you have the population" and the screens. WE have 3 screens and a small population so we find that after a while, and it's never or rarely more than 4 weeks the film has worn out its welcome no matter how fine or it can be exceeded by newer higher demand films that may be more expensive but usually pay off by having a higher ticket buy and concession purchases. AS an old friend said, "I'd rather have 50% of something than 70 % of nothing."

Mike Hurley
www.bigscreenbiz.com
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.198 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction