Banner
Home Forums Movie Theaters The Lobby Oscar strikes back against DVD competition
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Oscar strikes back against DVD competition

Oscar strikes back against DVD competition 09 Jul 2006 23:18 #12960

After reading this article it makes me worry for the cinema. I myself can not think of not going to the movies. But as a business owner looking to start a movie theater this makes me worry about what is going to happen to movie theater and movie theater owners. What do the rest of you think about this?

Oscar strikes back against DVD competition
Motion picture academy wants to make such films ineligible for awards.
By ROBERT W. BUTLER
The Kansas City Star
Many industry analysts predict that it’s just a matter of time before movies are released simultaneously to theaters, home video and/or pay-per-view TV.

But perhaps not, if the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has anything to say about it.

AMPAS is considering a rules change that would make films released simultaneously on the big and little screen ineligible for Oscar consideration.

“We’re the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,” academy president Sid Ganis told Variety. “If you want to premiere your movie on TV, there’s a very fine academy that handles that.”

The academy already has a rule that for a documentary to be considered for an Oscar it may not play on TV or the Internet within two months of its initial theatrical release. Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11” was disqualified from consideration as best documentary feature because it was shown on pay-per-view TV the night before the 2004 election.

The big studios like the idea of simultaneous release in all formats because they would have to mount only one expensive advertising campaign for a movie. Currently they furiously market a film when it opens in theaters and then again when it comes out on video a few months later.

It may all come down to how committed Hollywood is to the theatrical experience. Many films earn far more on cable, pay-per-view and DVD than at the theaters. The question is just how vital an initial theatrical run is to the success of a movie.

For obvious reasons, movie exhibitors are united in opposing simultaneous releases.

According to a recent national survey of Americans’ movie-going and video-watching habits, even if we really want to see a new movie, nearly half of us will wait for it to come out on home video or pay-per-view.

In May, Guideline Inc., a custom business research and analysis firm, did a national survey of 1,000 respondents that showed only 22 percent of us prefer seeing a movie on the big screen first.

Our preference for home entertainment is reflected in DVD sales and rentals. Between 2003 and 2004 DVD purchases grew 33 percent to $21 billion; during the same period DVD rentals grew 39 percent to nearly $6 billion.

Hollywood serves movies your way

Though movie studios fought the idea of home video when the VCR was born in the '70s, today Hollywood wants you to watch movies any way you want to — as long as they're not pirated — on demand, via Internet download, on DVDs and high-definition discs.

This change in attitude comes as fewer people are going to theaters to see films, and as DVD, which has been a cash cow since it arrived in 1997, is showing signs of age:

• After three years of double-digit growth, DVD sales and rentals are expected to slow from 2005's $22.8 billion total.

• Box-office revenue fell from $9.4 billion in 2004 to $8.8 billion in 2005 with 150 million fewer tickets sold, and little rebound is expected this year.

Two types of moviegoers emerged from a recent Nielsen survey: Avid moviegoers, who go to 10 or more movies a year, said they would go to a theater even if movies were available simultaneously on DVD. Lighter moviegoers, who attend one to five movies each year, were more likely to have downloaded, rented or bought a DVD or on-demand movie.

SURVEY
WHY NOT GO TO A THEATER?

Top reasons people didn't see movies in theaters (on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being most significant):

Movies not very good/did not meet expectations 6.7
Ticket prices too high 6.4
Concessions too expensive 5.7
Lifestyle/family changes 5.6
Rather wait for DVD 5.0
Too many ads before movie 4.8
People talking 4.2

Source: March 2006 survey of 2,687 members of the Movie Advisory Board online moviegoer community

[This message has been edited by bigbadvoodoodaddy (edited July 10, 2006).]

[This message has been edited by bigbadvoodoodaddy (edited July 10, 2006).]
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Oscar strikes back against DVD competition 13 Jul 2006 13:49 #12961

  • Mike
  • Mike's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 5028
  • Thank you received: 43
  • Karma: 15
'Two types of moviegoers emerged from a recent Nielsen survey: Avid moviegoers, who go to 10 or more movies a year, said they would go to a theater even if movies were available simultaneously on DVD. Lighter moviegoers, who attend one to five movies each year, were more likely to have downloaded, rented or bought a DVD or on-demand movie.' wow! That's really big news! As in NOT! That's the way it's been for decades. Look in a NATO yearbook for those stats.



Michael Hurley
Impresario
Michael Hurley
Impresario
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.154 seconds
attraction attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction
attraction